Search - Wolf Eyes :: Burned Mind

Burned Mind
Wolf Eyes
Burned Mind
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1

Wolf Eyes are at the forefront of a quickly expanding American noise scene. The music this trio creates is truly terrifying. Sonic touchstones include Throbbing Gristle, early Cabaret Voltaire, Black Flag, Whitehouse, pre-...  more »

     
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CD Details

All Artists: Wolf Eyes
Title: Burned Mind
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sub Pop
Release Date: 9/28/2004
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock
Styles: Electronica, Goth & Industrial, Experimental Music
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 098787063820

Synopsis

Album Description
Wolf Eyes are at the forefront of a quickly expanding American noise scene. The music this trio creates is truly terrifying. Sonic touchstones include Throbbing Gristle, early Cabaret Voltaire, Black Flag, Whitehouse, pre-Asheton Destroy All Monsters, Negative Approach, Swans, and early Sonic Youth, with whom they're playing all summer.

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Member CD Reviews

Joseph M. (RoboticJoe) from TOLEDO, OH
Reviewed on 9/7/2010...
What's else can I say? Noise will be noise!

CD Reviews

Authentic Industrial Music
Crypt | Arkham | 11/05/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This could also be titled "A fresh approach to old school Industrial", but I don't feel the term "old school" is relevent.
The use of tapes, guitar noise, samples, crackling electronics, screaming synth noises and factory-machine rhythms brings to mind SPK, Throbbing Gristle, NON, Whitehouse, and even the great Merzbow. It's not "music" in a traditional way, although there are pleanty of mechanical rhythms buried underneath the noise. This is sonic Da Da. It's more likely to piss off the average listener or frighten them away, than it is to be played at the average pseudo gothic club. This isn't EBM or whatever else that gets the "Industrial" label slapped on it in other words. I wouldn't exactly call it Noise-Rock in the vein of early Swans either. This is more like what Throbbing Gristle was up to in the late 70's. Oh by the way, I discovered this band purely by accident. I was browsing through the "experimental" section (which contains everything from Krautrock to Industrial) at a record store and I just happened to dig the cover, a wonderfully macabre pen and ink drawing, and bought the album without ever having heard of the band before. I'm very pleased that I discoverd Wolf Eyes."
You are slowly dying...
Alex Whelan | San Jose, CA | 08/19/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"...and this is all you can hear.

Now, to get this out of the way, this is unpleasant music. The band knows this. We as listeners know this. The point of the music is not to be consumer-friendly. You think DOA-era Throbbing Gristle was thinking about mass appeal? Fuggettaboutit.

No, this is a manifesto. This is a sonic map to your darkest fears. This might not frighten you (it should, though), but it should at least make you rethink a few things.

Music by definition is entirely in the eye of the beholder. Some people think that Frequency LSD by Masonna is just as musical as Beethoven. I'm not sure if I completely agree, but the point is music can be anything aural. So, everyone who has beef with this album being "pure noise" or "talentless" or "unlistenable" are missing the point. It's SUPPOSED to be UNLISTENABLE. Whitehouse makes noise because it's noise, not because it requires talent or anything. So does Wolf Eyes.

All the complaints in the world about this CD are all basically about the same concept: it's not music. I don't really know what to tell you all. Your definition of music is different than ours. We accept this not just as music, but more importantly as ART. This does take talent, it does take effort. Trust me (I'm a noise composer myself), this takes plenty of time. It might sound sloppy, and it might sound talentless. But some of the most revolutionary, influential bands were the same way.

Mudhoney (who I believe were among the first true grungers) sounded like absolute garbage when Superfuzz Bigmuff first came out. But it wasn't about the music. It was the MESSAGE: the combination of garage punk and the DIY attitude of the first wave of punk had not been done before to that extent. They (along with Green River and a few others) created a revolution. But their musicianship? Awful. But by that time, it didn't matter.

I realize I may be rambling a bit, but you have to understand where I'm coming from. I try to compose music like this. And I'm nowhere near as good (yes, GOOD) as these guys. It takes effort that you might not immediately see. But it's there.

So, enough bashing. Let's take this for what it really is: a statement. A piece of art. Whether you think it's music or not, it deserves to be noteworthy. That's all that really matters."