Search - Jean Sibelius, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Matti Hyokki :: Sibelius: Kullervo

Sibelius: Kullervo
Jean Sibelius, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Matti Hyokki
Sibelius: Kullervo
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

This magnificent choral symphony, which Sibelius wrote at the very beginning of his career, has acquired quite a following in recent years. It was his very first orchestral work, and its confidence and energy simply blew...  more »

     
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CD Details

All Artists: Jean Sibelius, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Matti Hyokki, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Helsinki University Chorus, Marianna Rorholm, Jorma Hynninen
Title: Sibelius: Kullervo
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony Classical
Original Release Date: 1/1/1993
Re-Release Date: 5/4/1993
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Theatrical, Incidental & Program Music
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 074645256320

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This magnificent choral symphony, which Sibelius wrote at the very beginning of his career, has acquired quite a following in recent years. It was his very first orchestral work, and its confidence and energy simply blew away contemporary audiences. Then Sibelius, always highly self-critical, prohibited any further performances during his lifetime. About two seconds into the very opening you realize just how wrong he was. The story tells of Kullervo, a tragic hero from Finnish mythology who destroys his family and friends before finally taking his own life. Scored for a large orchestra, male chorus, and two soloists, the music is truly epic in scale. Follow the words as you listen--it's terrific. --David Hurwitz

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CD Reviews

Sibelius experiences youthful angst
Timothy F. Ortlieb | USA | 06/20/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Kullervo is unmistakably early Sibelius. Anyone who has heard En Saga and Four Legends from the Kalevala will be familiar with the surging heroism (apparent from the beginning of the first movement), the youthful pathos, the extravagant formal ambition and the exotic touches characteristic of early Sibelius on display in this work. Structurally, it is not quite as accomplished as Sibelius' better-known works but the invention, resourcefulness and originality are most striking. No Sibelian will want to be without it, and this present recording seems hard to beat. The playing, singing and recording are excellent and whereas some versions take up more than one disc (which would seem to make it unnecessarily drawn-out), this version fits neatly onto one disc."