Search - Sergey Prokofiev, Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky :: Prokofiev Violin Concerto No. 2; Glazunov Violin Concerto; & Tchaikovsky Meditation

Prokofiev Violin Concerto No. 2; Glazunov Violin Concerto; & Tchaikovsky Meditation
Sergey Prokofiev, Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky
Prokofiev Violin Concerto No. 2; Glazunov Violin Concerto; & Tchaikovsky Meditation
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

This is the first recording of an extraordinarily talented young violinist. Born in Denmark to Polish-Israeli parents in 1975, Znaider won the Carl Nielsen International Violin Competition in 1992 and the Queen Elisabeth C...  more »

     
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Amazon.com
This is the first recording of an extraordinarily talented young violinist. Born in Denmark to Polish-Israeli parents in 1975, Znaider won the Carl Nielsen International Violin Competition in 1992 and the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels in 1997, and he's embarked on a flourishing career spanning several continents. From this recording, as from his concert appearances, it's clear that he is a virtuoso with a formidable, utterly secure, effortless but totally unobtrusive technique; a lovely tone of great warmth, purity, and flexibility; and a sensitive musical expressiveness so genuine that it needs no external effects, not even slides. Of the two Prokofiev concertos, the second is the more ingratiating and lyrical one, and Znaider makes the soaring melodies sing rapturously. His tone in the high register, so beloved by the composer, shimmers radiantly. There are also plenty of fast bravura passages, which Znaider tosses off with ease, brilliance, and absolute clarity. Better yet, he gives them shape and makes them sound like music, even the famously--or infamously--difficult, long, and jagged sections in the Finale. The Glazunov has a warm, ardent glow as well as a subdued, inward delicacy. Its bleak mournfulness is always noble and deeply felt. The Cadenza is wistful and introspective, the Finale elegant and charming. The Tchaikovsky Meditation is melancholy, but never becomes sentimental; the excellent orchestral solos stand out, while the violinist discreetly weaves figurations around them. This is a most promising and impressive debut. --Edith Eisler
 

CD Reviews

A great career is launched
Santa Fe Listener | Santa Fe, NM USA | 10/17/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Two nights ago while visiting Chicago I heard Nikolaj Znaider live, and it was a cpativating experience. I rushed home and bought this, his first CD, and it fulfills the promise of what I heard (he performed the Mendelssohn concerto with the CSO under Barenboim and has just recorded it). The Amazon reviewer has stated everything perfectly: Znaider is a virtuoso second and a musicain first, never intruding himself into the compoer's total conception. He plays a gorgeous Stradivarius, caught on this CD very well in quite closely miked sound.

To show you how unassuming this virtuoso is, the second half of the CSO program was devoted to the Mahelr Fifth. Without fanfare Znaider sneaked into the back row of the first violins and played along, and he even turned the pages for his desk mate!

There are fine versions of the Prokofiev Second around, but Znaider is competitive with all of them. HIs is better conducted (by Maris Jansons) than the vengerov or Shaham recordings I previously favored. If you want warm, lyrical violin playing to melt the heart a la Joshua Bell, rest asured that Znaider is off to a great career with exactly that style."
Awarded Rosette Award from Penguin Guide to Recorded Classic
T. Carlsen | 09/07/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The Glazunov piece is amazing! I highly recommend that as an MP3 download. The entire album is good, but the violin playing in the Glazunov is very special.

This album received a Rosette designations from Penguin Guide. It also received a strong review from Gramophone, which called it "a confident, abundantly characterful account... Znaider brings an extra lyrical ardour and tender intimacy to Prokofiev's soaring melodies, not to mention a greater rhythmic swagger in the finale. But what really lifts this account to special heights is the chamber-like rapport and concentration Znaider generates with Mariss Jansons and the Bavarian Radio SO..."

If you have an MP3 player, download the Glazanov for sure. I have not heard better. The Tchaikovsky is excellent. The Prokofiev is very good, but I have heard just as good elsewhere."