Search - Over the Rhine :: Ohio

Ohio
Over the Rhine
Ohio
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #2


     
   
8

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: Over the Rhine
Title: Ohio
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 1
Label: Narada
Original Release Date: 1/1/2003
Re-Release Date: 8/19/2003
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Indie & Lo-Fi, Singer-Songwriters, Adult Alternative, Folk Rock
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
Other Editions: Ohio
UPCs: 724359099620, 0724359099651, 724359099651

Similarly Requested CDs

 

Member CD Reviews

James C. from MIDDLETOWN, DE
Reviewed on 8/7/2009...
Nice vocals
0 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.

CD Reviews

Heck, I don't know how to review this beautiful thing...
Bighairydoofus | Brooklyn Park, MN United States | 02/28/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I'm new to Over the Rhine. I don't have much in the way of context to review them. I happened to be lucky enough to hear them on radioparadise(dotcom), an online radio station that plays some really incredible music. I owe them a great deal, not the least of which is an empty wallet from all the new music that I've purchased in the last couple of months.Hmmm... how to describe them. Superb musicianship, an incredible vocalist, lyrics that put most other bands to shame, a band that drifts effortlessly from country to R&B to gospel. I don't know what to do with these guys. I'm a fan of what the 4AD label used to be, and if OTR had been around ten to fifteen years ago, they should have been on that label. To me, that's a compliment - others may think differently.I'm almost afraid of checking into their backcatalog for fear of disappointment, this album is so good.The title track makes me cry. A song about how home is where home is, no matter where it is or how pretty it is or otherwise. The last time I cried at any type of music was "song to the siren" from This Mortal Coil. Ten plus years ago. These guys are for real, packing a lyrical punch that hits you right HERE. I can't do these guys justice, but it is really wonderful music. I can't recommend it highly enough."
A new OtR convert
Simon Bidwell | Wellington, New Zealand | 01/25/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Oh my god. I'd never heard anything by Over the Rhine before - not a song. A work colleague who sits near me lent me the second CD of `Ohio' and I listened to it on my headphones. About ten bars into `Long Lost Brother' the hairs on my neck were standing on end. Now I've listened to both CDs five times each over the last couple of days, and I can't stop. I've read all the reviews here, and elsewhere, and hunted down interviews with the band, trying to get my head around how anyone can make such intimate, poignant, heartbreakingly beautiful music.Probably much the same as anyone who hears OtR for the first time, I spent a while searching for points of reference for Karin Burgquist's voice. I came up with `Sarah McLachlan after a bottle of whisky', `the musical love child of Edith Piaf and Tom Waits', and then gave up. Comparisons fail. In any case, I cede to other comments in these Amazon reviews: `like calico smoke'; `like the mouth of a river flowing from somewhere far away but familiar'; like one long sigh'. All I know is it sends shivers down my spine. And the music - the acoustic guitar, bass, drums, pedal steel and, above all, piano, are sparse and purposeful, adding emphases and flourishes but still leaving acres of space for Karin Burgquist's voice to float in, weary and sexy and ethereal all at once.At first I thought I much preferred the second CD. Now the first is probably my favourite. Different songs have grown on me, while I still like the ones that first caught my attention. After several listens I've realised that one of the strengths of OtR is the clever and evocative lyrics. But the first couple of times I had tears in my eyes without even *hearing* any of the lyrics. There are other paradoxes: how can this band be so technically proficient yet still sound so direct and raw? How is it that in their most powerful moments they sound like they're holding something in? (In the last choruses of `Changes Come', Karin is hardly pronouncing the words, sounding like she's choking something back - tears? anger?). There's gospel, R&B and folk here, with country probably predominant. I'm tempted to suggest, however, that if you like music, full stop, and have a functioning attention span, you'll fall in love with `Ohio' and with Over the Rhine. I for one am a convert."