Search - Lee Musiker, Zachary Provost, Lucia Micarelli :: Music from a Farther Room

Music from a Farther Room
Lee Musiker, Zachary Provost, Lucia Micarelli
Music from a Farther Room
Genres: World Music, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

For anyone who has attended Josh Groban's phenomenal live show, you will have undoubtedly had the pleasure of seeing and hearing his lead violinist, Lucia Micarelli. Lucia came to Josh's tour after appearing with the Trans...  more »

     
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Album Description
For anyone who has attended Josh Groban's phenomenal live show, you will have undoubtedly had the pleasure of seeing and hearing his lead violinist, Lucia Micarelli. Lucia came to Josh's tour after appearing with the Trans- Siberian Orchestra playing arenas across the U.S. in 2003. With the close of the second leg of Josh's tour, Lucia is recording her debut album in New York and London with producer Paul Schwartz. Musical selections will range from the works of composers Ravel and Ennio Morricone to David Bowie.

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Member CD Reviews

Shirley D. (lavendy) from SALEM, OR
Reviewed on 11/11/2011...
Very nice contemporary classic music.
0 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.

CD Reviews

Something Beautiful This Way Comes
Lee Armstrong | Winterville, NC United States | 02/15/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"On stage with Josh Groban, Lucia stands barefoot on the stage in a flowing blue taffeta gown standing almost on her toes like a ballerina as she reaches for that exclusive note. Groban generously acknowledges her brilliance, serves as executive producer on this CD and cites it from the stage, which led to this wonderful disc playing in my home. On "Music from A Farther Room," Lucia blazes a superb trail. The Paul Schwartz opener "Samarkand" throbs and pulses magically. From there to "Oblivion," a touching moving piece with Lucia making the Hannibal Fagnola Turin violin's tones swell majestically. Some of David Bowie's work has been greatly underrated for its musicality, but it's safe to say that Lucia takes "Lady Grinning Soul" from Bowie's 1973 "Aladdin Sane" LP to places only she (and now we through her) could have envisioned. The "Ravel String Quintet in F Major" is gloriously stunning with its pixie-like strings juxtaposed with Lucia's weeping violin. Leigh Nash adds the lone vocal on the Celtic-inflected "She is Like the Swallow." When I saw Josh Groban in Raleigh, his opening act Chris Botti played a jazz version of "My Funny Valentine." Putting that & Lucia's versions side by side is a study in how the same melody can yield vastly different feelings in the hands of different artists. Micharelli closes the set as stunningly as she began in the breathtaking "Nocturne/Bohemian Rhapsody" that marries a Paul Schwartz orchestral beginning to Queen's Freddy Mercury's rock classic. From beginning to end, Lucia Micharelli takes us to emotional places, exquisitely feeling, spanning centuries. What a talented debut from this young performer! Bravo!"
I Didn't Want To Give 5 Stars, But......
G-Dexter | Lakewood, NY United States | 12/17/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I am a huge music fan and my interests span many styles. I love progressive rock, ambient/tribal music, jazz, rhythm and blues, and I LOVE classical chamber music. Perhaps not surprisingly, I've always found a close correlation between chamber music and the progressive rock movements. Both types of music combine precise and thoughtful composition, thematic continuity and a rigorous requirement for outstanding musicianship. Some of my favorite prog-rock pieces include lush orchestration as a supplement to the heavy electric sound of contemporary instruments; the mid-70's works of Jethro Tull jump to mind.

That being said, I've never really enjoyed "cross-over" music. I've always felt uncomfortable with established classical musicians trying their hand at "rock music." There's nothing creepier than the respected and revered artists trying to be something they are not; Sills singing disco or Perlman playing Nirvana. Okay, that may be extreme, but my point is - the attempt is usually feckless, uninspired and doomed to mediocrity.

Recently, my son and I attended a concert by the aforementioned band, Jethro Tull. We were absolutely blown out of our seats by a beautiful, barefooted wisp of a girl who came out on stage and stole the show from the grizzled veteran rockers with her charm, grace and unquestionable talent. She played a combination of violin-flute duets with Tull's front man, Ian Anderson, and absolutely floored the audience with a beautifully touching version of the Sibelius violin concerto, here labeled AURORA. From that point on, I was hooked! Not only did she play the classical pieces with great skill and emotion, but she absolutely rocked on classic Tull tunes, KASHMIR by Led Zeppelin, and her own stunning arrangement of Queen's BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY.

This CD is a beautiful debut and she has earned hundreds, if not thousands of life long fans with her brave choice of touring with popular musicians of all genre's. I didn't want to like this CD, but I ended up loving it!
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