Search - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, William Christie, Rosa Mannion :: Mozart - Die Zauberflöte / Mannion, Dessay, Blochwitz, Scharinger, Hagen, Les Art Florissants, Christie

Mozart - Die Zauberflöte / Mannion, Dessay, Blochwitz, Scharinger, Hagen, Les Art Florissants, Christie
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, William Christie, Rosa Mannion
Mozart - Die Zauberflöte / Mannion, Dessay, Blochwitz, Scharinger, Hagen, Les Art Florissants, Christie
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (20) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (24) - Disc #2


      
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CD Reviews

Dear Tony...
Samuel Krum | London | 10/28/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"You are right, Natalie Dessay sings the Queen of the Nights aria a semi-tone lower. In fact, the whole opera is a tone lower. It is recorded on Authentic instruments, which were tuned a semi tone lower in mozarts day than they are now. Therefore almost all pieces recorded on baroque instruments are a semi-tone lower.
I think the recording is masterful. Semi tone lower or not..."
Crystal clear recording and my favorite opera disc
05/23/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This performance is very involving; the period instruments have an unusually warm sound, but retain their clarity. The sopranos do not shriek excessively, as is the case with many larger-scale performances. I never liked opera until I heard performances like this; the singing is sweet, pure, enthusiastic. The sound quality is excellent; warm, detailed, somewhat dry--but it suits this performance perfectly."
The Magic Flute as Mozart would have heard it?
G. Camara | Sao Jose dos Campos, SP Brazil | 11/06/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Coming from a highly successful carrer in Baroque choral music (Rameau, Mondonville, Charpentier, Monteverdi) William Christie and his talented Les Arts Florissants give us what is arguably the most challenging Zauberflote around. We think we know it all: the "Queen of the Night" aria, Tamino & Pamina, Papageno & Papagena... Christie challenges our convictions: why should Mozart sound like Verdi when his background is closer to Bach and Monteverdi? Why should Mozart's chamber and piano music sound so subdued and our modern versions of Zauberflote be sung forte or mezzo-forte? In this recording (as other reviewers have pointed out) all instruments are toned as they would have been in Mozart's time, and the conductor does not force the singers to do bravura arias all the time. The result is a unique recording that will give much satisfaction to all listerners. Even if you own other recordings of Zauberflote, try this one. It will be a pleasant and welcome choc."