Search - Kevin Coyne :: Pointing the Finger / Politicz

Pointing the Finger / Politicz
Kevin Coyne
Pointing the Finger / Politicz
Genres: Folk, International Music, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #1

Although this Release was Planned in Conjunction with Coyne Before his Untimely Death, this Fantastic Double Album on One CD Serves as a Fitting Tribute to a Remarkable Talent and Man, and a Snapshot at the Height of his C...  more »

     
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CD Details

All Artists: Kevin Coyne
Title: Pointing the Finger / Politicz
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Cherry Red UK
Release Date: 3/7/2005
Album Type: Import
Genres: Folk, International Music, Pop, Rock
Styles: Europe, British Isles, Singer-Songwriters
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Details
Although this Release was Planned in Conjunction with Coyne Before his Untimely Death, this Fantastic Double Album on One CD Serves as a Fitting Tribute to a Remarkable Talent and Man, and a Snapshot at the Height of his Career Both Albums Having Been Originally Released on Vinyl in the Early 1980's. Coyne Had Worked Hard Touring and Recording Material for Most of the Last 35 Years.

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CD Reviews

Early 1980s albums
Pieter | Johannesburg | 07/31/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This CD reissue combines two of Coyne's very different albums from the early eighties. Pointing The Finger (tracks 1 to 10) has the traditional Coyne rock sound with guitars, drums and keyboards and him sounding somewhat like an anguished early Van Morrison.

Let Love Reside stands out with its dramatic arrangement, as does the title track with its marching beat in which he expresses his ambivalent feelings about England. Song Of The Womb and Old Lady are very poignant songs too, but Pointing The Finger cannot be favourably compared to his great albums like Case History or Marjory Razorblade.

Politicz (tracks 11 to 19) was his most experimental album. Songs like Your Holiness, Liberation and Fun Flesh are typical Coyne protest songs. Strangely, the drum machine takes over on Tell The Truth, Banzai, Poisoning You and Magnolia Street, giving us Coyne's social comment about suffocating relationships, empty pleasures and the smothered individual in a synth-pop setting.

Magnolia in fact reminds me a bit of Frank Zappa's disco send-up "Dancing Fool." It's back to guitar for the sad song Photographs with its beautiful melody and poetic lyric. An unusual musical detour for Coyne, Politicz is worthwhile and interesting. But for those who wish to investigate the best work of this obscure genius, I strongly recommend Marjory Razorblade, Dynamite Daze or the live album In Living Black & White."