Search - Richard Alison, Daniel Bacheler, William Byrd :: Fantasies, Ayres and Dances - Elizabethan and Jacobean Consort Music

Fantasies, Ayres and Dances - Elizabethan and Jacobean Consort Music
Richard Alison, Daniel Bacheler, William Byrd
Fantasies, Ayres and Dances - Elizabethan and Jacobean Consort Music
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Special Interest, Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #1

If you had to reduce your recordings of 16th-century instrumental music to only one disc (a horrendous thought!), you'd do very well to keep this one. Rarely is any recording of any repertoire so well conceived, programm...  more »

     
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If you had to reduce your recordings of 16th-century instrumental music to only one disc (a horrendous thought!), you'd do very well to keep this one. Rarely is any recording of any repertoire so well conceived, programmed, and performed--and rarely is the music so consistently and incredibly beautiful. The age in which this music was created may have been infinitely different from ours, but we dearly need music with such sincerity and heart these days. Lutenist Julian Bream and his period-instrument ensemble draw us into an enchanting world of beautiful, sometimes heartbreaking melodies and lovely harmonies. Occasionally we hear a lively dance, and a few times we hear Robert Tear's plaintive tenor. But mostly it's the viols, Renaissance flute, cittern, and lute performing some of the finest examples of English Renaissance music we're ever likely to hear. --David Vernier

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CD Reviews

Wonderful reading of Elizabethan and Jacobean pieces
Matthew Hayden | Northern California USA | 12/30/2008
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Elizabethan/Jacobean music is not particularly accessible to the average listener, who generally hears a bowdlerized background music at a Renfest or gets some sense of it through Anglican church harmony. Julian Bream, however, has given the music a face through his recordings of Dowland, Cutting, and others. His playing and arranging for the Consort is historically accurate - he plays with authentic lute thumb-under technique, for example, and the vocalists sing in what is thought to be accurate fashions.

It's an excellent recording, recommended as an introduction to this music."