Search - Dupree Bolton :: Fireball

Fireball
Dupree Bolton
Fireball
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

This CD features over 50 minutes by the fiery trumpeter, Dupree Bolton. The music consists of a rare television appearance with the Curtis Amy sextet featuring Bolton, as well as studio takes from an unissued Pacific Jazz ...  more »

     
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CD Details

All Artists: Dupree Bolton
Title: Fireball
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Uptown Jazz
Original Release Date: 1/1/2009
Re-Release Date: 1/20/2009
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Modern Postbebop, Traditional Jazz & Ragtime, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 026198275624

Synopsis

Product Description
This CD features over 50 minutes by the fiery trumpeter, Dupree Bolton. The music consists of a rare television appearance with the Curtis Amy sextet featuring Bolton, as well as studio takes from an unissued Pacific Jazz session. Bolton next shows up in Oklahoma as part of a prison band illustrating that he had not lost any of his flash despite the long years in prison. Dupree Bolton will always remain a true Fireball.
 

CD Reviews

Legendary Trumpet Player
Michael L. Slavin | New Jersey | 07/12/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Dupree Bolton was not widely known. So I was quite happy to see the release of this CD on the Uptown label. It consists of three different sessions: (a) a live radio broadcast from Los Angeles featuring four tunes recorded in 1962 with Curtis Amy's group. Some very nice guitar playing by Ray Crawford. (b) A Pacific Jazz session recorded in 1963. There were two songs by a quintet. (c) Oklahoma Prison Band which recorded four songs in 1980. There is an excellent little booklet that chronicles the career of Dupree Bolton. Unfortunately, that though all playing is satisfactory there are no hidden gems to be discovered. All the solos are fairly short. I think if there had been more stretching out the end result might well have been more memorable. But, of course, presumably the producers had to use what was there. I'm glad the album was marketed but if you listen to these solos by Bolton you will not hear the exciting fiery playing he was known to be capable of. Nothing here compares to Dupree Bolton's exuberant Clifford Brownish solo on One Down from the Harold Land album The Fox recorded in 1959. So, I'd certainly purchase The Fox album before this to hear Dupree Bolton at his best. I give this album four stars mainly because it gives recognition to Dupree Bolton. The content, however, in my view is three stars."