Search - Bruce Cockburn :: Breakfast In New Orleans, Dinner In Timbuktu

Breakfast In New Orleans, Dinner In Timbuktu
Bruce Cockburn
Breakfast In New Orleans, Dinner In Timbuktu
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, International Music, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

As well as any record he's ever made, this Bruce Cockburn release illustrates just what makes him so compelling and tough to corner. Opening with a well-greased John Lee Hooker groove, Cockburn slides from a dream in which...  more »

     
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Bruce Cockburn
Title: Breakfast In New Orleans, Dinner In Timbuktu
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: Rykodisc
Original Release Date: 9/14/1999
Release Date: 9/14/1999
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, International Music, Pop, Rock
Styles: New Wave & Post-Punk, Contemporary Folk, North America, Adult Contemporary, Singer-Songwriters, Adult Alternative
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 014431040726

Synopsis

Amazon.com
As well as any record he's ever made, this Bruce Cockburn release illustrates just what makes him so compelling and tough to corner. Opening with a well-greased John Lee Hooker groove, Cockburn slides from a dream in which he'd "been wearing O.J.'s gloves" and couldn't get them off, into the stranger, waking world of punks, cafes, tourists, and journalistic half-truths. From his ceaseless wanderings, Cockburn has absorbed Brazilian, African, and Eastern musical accents. More importantly, he has a traveler's vision, always in awe of far-flung mysteries. His guitar work remains a marvel of rhythmic complexity and technical precision (the bloated fuzz reading of "Blueberry Hill," however, is an exception). Spoken word trances; white-hot Metheny-esque instrumentals; Dylan-esque cryptographies of politics and sex; and metaphysical love lyrics (three of which feature harmony from Lucinda Williams)--there's an off-hand, unpretentious ambition to these songs, a visceral sense of spiritual and artistic fulfillment. --Roy Kasten

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CD Reviews

His Twenty Eighth Album
Cletus J. "Bubba" Huckabee Jr. | Chesterfield County | 12/16/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"(62.36 minutes)

Now if you ask me, and a lot of aficionados of geographic oddities do now and again, the title of this album describes a feat that would be surprisingly difficult to pull off. Bruce claims that he actually did that one day, ate breakfast in New Orleans, and ate his dinner in Timbuktu, and I ain't about to suggest the man is fibbin' but that sure would be a logistical conundrum. What with the curvature of the earth and the sun advancing to the west, and the Coriolis Effect and the uncertain air connections between Louisiana and Mali... that one is a noggin' scratcher if there ever was one.

The odd title hides a very nice album, however, and the highlight is (in my humble and accurate opinion) the harmonization that Lucinda Williams offers on a couple of cuts. She is the perfect companion to the Cockburn style, and her voice is the yin to the Cockburn yang.

This album saw Cockburn put the electric guitars back in the rack, and reach for the acoustic guitars a little more frequently than he had done in the previous albums. That allowed for a little more of an airy feel to the work and a lightness that was not so present in the previous release. I kind of appreciate that because I was starting to miss the lightness of his early folksy days and wanted to hear some more of that acoustic picking he is known for. I hear he uses super glue on his finger tips so he can really get in there and pluck hard against the strings, and whatever the technique is - it works.

This album also features Cockburn covering someone else's tune - something that doesn't happen in the studio very often. I am still wondering why. Blueberry Hill is a great song, and his cover is a nice touch, but does it fit in this album? I ain't too sure. It is awfully hard to get Fats Domino out of my head when I hear Bruce sing it.

I recommend this album as a terrific place to start if you are not familiar with his latter work... or if you just want to listen to some good, toe tappin' tunes while you drive your truck to town. Me and Junior like this one a lot and listen to it whenever we go in to the feed store to pick up rat bait.

"
Lyric brilliance backed by strong music
Peter Grant | Hobart, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA | 05/15/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"A prolific producer of fine, lyric-driven music for nearly 30 years, Bruce Cockburn is consistently able to turn his life observations into striking and thoughtful songs. On "Breakfast in New Orleans" this alchemist's gift is applied to topics ranging from the ecological ("The Embers of Eden") to the philosophical ("When You Give It Away") to the personal ("Isn't That What Friends Are For?").

Cockburn's gritty singing style is most effective, often touching listeners as though sung only for them. And although some dislike the talking-style technique he uses with some songs, it fits well with that personal and poetic approach. While the musical styles vary - Cockburn's fine bluesy guitar instrumentals sit alongside a laid back re-make of "Blueberry Hill" and some African-tinged pieces - most will seek out this album for its lyric brilliance. The fact that the musical quality is so high is a bonus.

"
Great!
J. McAndrew | USA | 06/13/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Last Night of the World" and "Look How Far" are the best tracks. I have only seen Bruce live once, in Minneapolis over ten years ago...need to see him again and soon!What a treasure of creativity and positive energy this man is...I would love him to produce one of my songs, like "Sister."There are not many with the talent this man has. :)Jeffrey McAndrew"