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Savage Garden
Savage Garden
Savage Garden
Genre: Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

As these two boys from Brisbane, Australia, know, it doesn't hurt to be endorsed by Rosie O'Donnell. When the Queen of Nice sang the words to "I Want You" and the praises of the duo behind it, the song catapulted up the ch...  more »

      
   

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CD Details

All Artists: Savage Garden
Title: Savage Garden
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 156
Label: Sony
Original Release Date: 4/15/1997
Release Date: 4/15/1997
Genre: Pop
Styles: Dance Pop, Adult Contemporary, Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 074646795422, 5099748716125, 766489081922, 766484254826, 074646795422

Synopsis

Amazon.com
As these two boys from Brisbane, Australia, know, it doesn't hurt to be endorsed by Rosie O'Donnell. When the Queen of Nice sang the words to "I Want You" and the praises of the duo behind it, the song catapulted up the charts. Largely ignored by the serious music press, Savage Garden have cultivated a vast fan base on the strength of their music--and airplay--alone. As formulaic as it may appear, the ballad "Truly Madly Deeply" was lodged at No. 1 for week after week for a reason--it's damn catchy and a welcome reprieve from overdone rock ballads. Lead singer Darren Hayes lends the same yearning vocal style to the third--and best--single from the album, "To the Moon & Back," a slice of synth-pop genius that culminates in a dramatic crescendo of strings, courtesy of coleader Daniel Jones. --Rebecca Wallwork

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Member CD Reviews

Aileen R. (aileen) from N HOLLYWOOD, CA
Reviewed on 5/21/2008...
"As these two boys from Brisbane, Australia, know, it doesn't hurt to be endorsed by Rosie O'Donnell. When the Queen of Nice sang the words to 'I Want You' and the praises of the duo behind it, the song catapulted up the charts. Largely ignored by the serious music press, Savage Garden have cultivated a vast fan base on the strength of their music--and airplay--alone. As formulaic as it may appear, the ballad 'Truly Madly Deeply' was lodged at No. 1 for week after week for a reason--it's damn catchy and a welcome reprieve from overdone rock ballads. Lead singer Darren Hayes lends the same yearning vocal style to the third--and best--single from the album, 'To the Moon & Back,' a slice of synth-pop genius that culminates in a dramatic crescendo of strings, courtesy of coleader Daniel Jones." --Rebecca Wallwork (Amazon.com)
0 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.
Amy T. (simplyamy) from DAKOTA DUNES, SD
Reviewed on 8/16/2007...
don't tell anyone, but this is a great CD
1 of 2 member(s) found this review helpful.
Melanie W. (novelwriter) from SURFSIDE BCH, SC
Reviewed on 7/21/2007...
This is a good CD. This particular cd has two of my favorite songs by this group.
0 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.
Jessica T. (jessicatok) from LINCOLN, NE
Reviewed on 4/21/2007...
Basic pop from the 90's band.
1 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.

CD Reviews

Savage garden album
K. T. Truong | CA, USA | 01/09/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I love this album. It has some great songs like "Truly, Madly, Deeply", "Santa Monica", "To The Moon & Back", and "Tears of Pearls". The singer in Savage Garden has a great voice too."
Top notch pop record
Cloud | Canada | 10/20/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The word "pop" seems to have gotten a bad reputation over the years. What used to signify the catchy hooks and melodies or the flawless songwriting has now become used to criticize bands becoming too mainstream or dumbing down their music for the masses. However, that's what makes these songs have staying power is when you catch yourself humming the tune on your way to work or while you're cleaning the house. Savage Garden, despite really only having 2 releases, developed some of the most memorable tunes of the decade and this is one example of an album that you just have to crank and tap your foot to.

To the Moon and Back: The album begins with this synth-driven tune, with a more atmospheric slant and it makes great use of the sonic landscape and seems like it's in its own little world. Even the Spanish guitar solo doesn't sound out of place. 9/10

I Want You: THE song to play when you're playing sports or travelling in your car, this song just screams to be turned up and have you work out or something. Fast vocal delivery, an effective and simple guitar arpeggio, this is the song to crank up. My one thing: what's with that yelping/dog noise in the bridge/ 9.5/10

Truly Madly Deeply: Men, take note: serenade this song to a girl and you're guaranteed some positive looks going your way...hopefully, if she's not stupid. What girl can resist a ballad like this; one that's entirely un-schmaltzy and utterly romantic at its core? Answer: no one. 9.5/10

Tears of Pearls: After one of the strongest 3-song album openings since the Joshua Tree or Nevermind, it'd be natural the 4th would be somewhat of a letdown. There's nothing wrong with the song since the beat is perfect for the dance floor but after the last 3, it seems like a step down but still a good one. 8/10

Universe: Back to ballad mode and while there's a quite enjoyable feel and works quite well, there's a certain typical thing about the song, like there's not enough to distinguish it from the other ballads they've done or on the record. A "Truly Madly Deeply"-lite, so to speak. Great vocals though. 7.5/10

Carry on Dancing: I quite like this one actually. The use of the falsetto vocals, the catchiness of the chorus and even the synths help make what should be an "eh" song rather memorable. Not an amazing track but well worth a listen for the singable qualities it has. 8.5/10

Violet: Kind of a funky number with a buzzy bass line, wah-wah guitars and a noticeable bump-and-grind sound, this is another dance floor number; only problem is that the song isn't exactly catchy outside of the music in the song. 6.5/10

Break Me, Shake Me: Another one of the singles that didn't seem to get as much recognition as the first 3, it's another enjoyable catchy number that's a bit more energetic in terms of energy. It's also pretty well-produced thanks to the guitar parts and pounding drums during the chorus and bouncy bass lines. Sonically it works, plus it's fun to sing. 9/10

A Thousand Words: A bit more atmospheric with an intro that could've fit on a U2 album Achtung Baby era; this is dominated primarily by the synth strings and funky guitars though the orchestra hits feel slightly out of place. It's similar to "Violet" in that it's not bad in terms of sound, just lacking in terms of staying power. 6.5/10

Promises: This is the album's "grower", the one that doesn't work but does eventually the more you listen to it. Again, funky bass lines, a strange shaker sound like a sugar packet for rhythm, though the use of the vocals and little touches help make this actually good. Give this one time. 8.5/10

Santa Monica: Back to ballad territory to close things off. It's pretty beautiful in terms of the sound though it's not really catchy like "Truly..." is but I love the use of the piano but it's just the song in terms of lyrics and vocal melodies that lack. It's one of those songs that you look back on and think that you loved how it sounded but can't remember how it went. 7/10

Despite some songs that are not as better written as others, the album flows as a whole and it's hard to skip anything even though individually the tracks might not work as well as others. But if you're into big toe-tapping pop, definitely get this one.
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