Search - McCoy Tyner :: Prelude & Sonata

Prelude & Sonata
McCoy Tyner
Prelude & Sonata
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1


      
?

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: McCoy Tyner
Title: Prelude & Sonata
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Milestone
Original Release Date: 11/21/1995
Re-Release Date: 11/15/1995
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 025218924429

Similar CDs


Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

A favourite record of mine
Anders Jonasson | Bankeryd Sweden | 01/01/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is one of those Cd:s that you come back to over and over again.. seems that I can not hear enough of this incredible music. I think this is the first collaboration Tyner/Redman on record.There is no sign of hesitation in Joshua Redmans playing....McCoy is at his very best... very very subtle..the intro on"For all we know" is just so beautiful.. and inspires Redman to a very lyrical solo.... then Mc Coy comes back and his solo comes so natural..well words is not enough anyway.
Another highlight is Mal Waldrons ballad "SoulEyes" where Antonio Hart brings that song to "new heights" backed by McCoys unbelieveable comping.
Charlie Chaplins "Smile" is played in a joyful mode.. and then it starts to groove the way only Tyner can do.
Anyway.. it is better to buy this CD then reading my insufficient attempt to make this outstanding record justice."
Tyner at his best
Josh Herman | NC, USA | 07/05/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"In Prelude and Sonata, Tyner (as usual) creates a masterpiece. Several tracks feature Joshua Redman, who is incredible on this albumn. Every single song is one you'll want to hear again. This is Tyner at his best, and for any fan of McCoy Tyner's, this albumn is a must have. It's amazing that Tyner can continue to pump out these incredible albumns, but that just shows his skill. The first track, Prelude in E minor, starts off the albumn with Joshua Redman's incredible playing in a beautiful song. The albumn then goes through several of Tyner's old classics before ending on Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor, which is just as awesome as the the first prelude and has an unbelivable solo by Tyner."