Search - McCoy Tyner :: Sama Layuca

Sama Layuca
McCoy Tyner
Sama Layuca
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

Starting in the early '70s, pianist McCoy Tyner put out a series of albums on Milestone, showcasing his commanding style in orchestral settings and establishing his reputation as a leader, moving out from the giant shadow ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: McCoy Tyner
Title: Sama Layuca
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Ojc
Release Date: 3/12/2002
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 025218707121

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Starting in the early '70s, pianist McCoy Tyner put out a series of albums on Milestone, showcasing his commanding style in orchestral settings and establishing his reputation as a leader, moving out from the giant shadow cast by his late mentor, John Coltrane. After the award-winning 1972 Sahara, the albums Atlantis and Enlightenment followed, each built on strong, modal foundations with plenty of percussion and Coltrane-inspired saxophonists. Sama Layuca, recorded in 1974, fits solidly into this mold. The three lengthy modal excursions--"Paradox," "La Cubaña," and "Sama Layuca"--deliver the pile-driving panoramas now associated with Tyner: large and lush, with Gary Bartz on alto and Azar Lawrence on tenor, relentlessly pushed by Tyner and drummer Billy Hart. These primeval and powerful tomes are balanced nicely by "Above the Rainbow," a duet for Tyner and vibist Bobby Hutcherson, and "Desert Cry," featuring the exotic oboe of John Stubblefield, each indicative of Tyner's (and Coltrane's) desire to equate tenderness with strength. --Wally Shoup

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CD Reviews

Hypnotic Egyptian Brilliance
Scott Williams | Oakland, CA United States | 07/07/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is my favorite Tyner Album. Tyner & Bobby Hutcherson have amazing chemistry and they demonstrate it here. The song writing has strong northern african and middle eastern influences. Tyner combines middle eastern scales and african roots with the coltrane experience. I think Tyner really carried the work he did with Coltrane & Pharoah Sanders forward to a new level with the work he did from 1968-1973. I think this albumn is the crown jewel in that body of work. Many of the tracks are instantiantly accessible with their catchy melodies, but there is also depth in the solos in textures that will keep you intested after the intial bliss of the hypnotic melodies wears off. Every track on this album is 5 star."