Search - Greg Osby :: Zero

Zero
Greg Osby
Zero
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
 
Like his colleagues in New York's jazz-funk M-BASE collective, alto saxophonist Greg Osby has spent considerable energy in his career exploring the common ground between hip-hop and jazz. So it is that twining rhythms with...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Greg Osby
Title: Zero
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Original Release Date: 6/30/1998
Release Date: 6/30/1998
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
Styles: Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Funk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 724349376021, 0724349376052, 724349376021

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Like his colleagues in New York's jazz-funk M-BASE collective, alto saxophonist Greg Osby has spent considerable energy in his career exploring the common ground between hip-hop and jazz. So it is that twining rhythms with rock-solid percussion are the core of Osby's music. Zero presents Osby at his sharpest, whittling away his tone to a precise, vibratoless quickness that aids his trills and hopping solos as they veer between soulful outposts. Osby has pulled together a dynamite band, from young piano and keyboard phenom Jason Moran (who ably handles piano, Fender Rhodes, and Hammond B-3 here) to guitarist Kevin McNeal and young drumming whiz Rodney Green. Osby's band sounds finger-snap funky, especially as it backs the leader's clipped-range alto while he explores permutations and altered chord arrangements throughout the CD. With tunes like "Savant Cycles" and "Concepticus in C," Zero promises hip, smart bop-inflected music, and Osby delivers solidly. --Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

An innovator
Yann LeCun | New Jersey | 04/03/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Too much of what you hear in New York these days is merely a rehash of old styles. Where is the innovation that Jazz is supposed to feed upon?Fortunately we have Greg Osby. Osby is one of a few true innovators on the NY scene. The first time I heard "Concepticus in C" (the last piece in this CD), it was like a punch in the face, almost as hard as the first time I heard Coltrane's Giant Steps. I listened to this short piece ten times in a row just to figure out its structure: it breaks all the rules. Osby's idea of rythm and harmony is really something else, very unusual, yet highly structured.I heard Osby in clubs in New York a few times, and walked out amazed every time. I highly recommend this CD."