Search - George Harrison :: Living in the Material World

Living in the Material World
George Harrison
Living in the Material World
Genres: Folk, World Music, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

#1 album originally released in 1973 that contains the #1 Pop single "Give Me Love". Now remastered and repackaged with two bonus tracks.

      
2

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: George Harrison
Title: Living in the Material World
Members Wishing: 13
Total Copies: 0
Label: Emd/Capitol
Release Date: 1/28/1992
Genres: Folk, World Music, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
Styles: Europe, British Isles, Singer-Songwriters, Oldies, Singer-Songwriters, Psychedelic Rock, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 077779411023, 077779411016, 077779411047, 077779441013

Synopsis

Album Description
#1 album originally released in 1973 that contains the #1 Pop single "Give Me Love". Now remastered and repackaged with two bonus tracks.

Similar CDs


Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

Madonna must have heard this record
Eric D. Putnam | The USA | 03/16/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Living in the Material World is the third album in a row that George Harrison released after the breakup of the Beatles that was very successful. All Things Must Pass (1970) was number one on the album charts for two months. The Concert For the Bangla Desh (1971) won the Grammy for album of the year. Living In the Material World followed suit by hitting number one when it was released in May of 1973. This album is currently out of print in the United States and that is a pity, because for the Exception of All Things Must Pass and Cloud Nine, this is the best George Harrison record to buy. This is also the last album that Harrison really seems to go all out on until Cloud Nine which didn't come out until 14 years after this one did. The songwriting on Living In the Material World is mostly good with only a couple of throwaway tracks. Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth) was the single the album's hit single and was number one for four weeks when it was released in 1973. But some other songs also deserve special mention. The song Living in the Material World is one of the very best that Harrison has written. The song also has a very good sitar section that fans of the Beatle days will enjoy. Sue Me, Sue You Blues is a bluesy acoustic rocker that finds Harrison in fine vocal and guitar form. There have been many that have said that this record is too preachy in regards to Harrison's religious beliefs. There is something to this critism to be sure but Living in the Material world is not a first listen record. Living in the Material World is a record that grows on the listener after many listens. Living in the Material World is also at times a very dark and very personal record for those who are fans of the Beatles music only. There problably hasn't been a more personal statement released by any of the Beatles since their breakup for the exception of John Lennon's Plastic Ono Band. Whatever it's flaws, Living In the Material World remains a rewarding listen more than 25 years after it was first released. Note: this album needs remastered in the worst way because it sounds flat on CD. It might have gotten five stars by this reviewer if someone cared enough about Mr. Harrison's music to remaster as well as reissue it in the United States."
We got Richie on a tour...
Ed Kaz | Shell Pile, NJ USA | 10/03/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"George Harrison may sound a tad "preachy" on this, his second album, but the sneaky humor is still very much intact. For example, in the title track of 1973's Living in the Material World he delivers a brief history of his previous band:

Met them all here in the material world
John and Paul here in the material world
Though we started out quite poor
we got Richie on a tour...
[Ringo drum fill]

Ya gotta love it.

OK, so this record is no All Things Must Pass, but then again, nothing could be. It certainly has its moments of glory though (Give Me Love, (Give Me Peace on Earth), and Don't Let Me Wait Too Long). There would be much mediocrity in his future (Extra Texture or Gone Troppo anyone?), followed by triumphant mature comebacks (Cloud Nine! Traveling Wilburys! Brainwashed!). So, in retrospect, this is a strong and satisfying collection of songs.

When this album was first released, I was all of sixteen and working as a dishwasher on the New Jersey Turnpike. As I scrubbed egg off plates, this album (in particular the song Don't Let Me Wait Too Long), used to dance through my head, making my miserable first job infinitely more bearable.

Living in the Material World covers an interesting period of a young pop-star learning about his life and his precarious place in the mad mad world of show business. Eventually, he found his way.

Minor grumble: I'm thrilled to have B-sides Miss O'Dell and Deep Blue attached to this release, but where the heck is the studio version of Bangladesh, the latter's A-side?

Huh?
Dhani?
Olivia?

Anyone?"
A worthy sequel to All things Must Pass
Eric D. Putnam | 11/06/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I was never able to find it in vinyl back in the days before CD, but then I lived in Puerto Rico at the time...however I found this American pressing of the CD, and fell in love with this album...it is not as long as All Things Must Pass...and it is much better than anything put out by McCartney at the time...sure there are preachy overtones to the songs, but the music is much better than many "inspirational" albums by mediocre Christian artists .."Give Me love" was a hit..."sue Me Sue You Blues" gives insight to the Beatle court complications...."Don't Let Me Wait Too Long" is catchy...the title track is mystical and the trademark sitar is in the background....."try Some , buy Some" is an overlooked gem......"Be Here Now"...is another beautiful song....the album is really exquisite, and does age well.....if George ever releases his own anthology it'll be interesting to hear outtakes and alternate versions of these wonderful songs...."