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Christmas Present
Andy Williams
Christmas Present
Genres: Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Of all the Andy Williams Christmas albums available, Christmas Present is by far his most religious collection. The release consists of thirteen tracks and all of them, with the possible exception of the title track, could...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Andy Williams
Title: Christmas Present
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony
Release Date: 10/25/1990
Genres: Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Holiday & Wedding, Oldies, Vocal Pop, Opera & Classical Vocal, Musicals, Traditional Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 074643319126

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Of all the Andy Williams Christmas albums available, Christmas Present is by far his most religious collection. The release consists of thirteen tracks and all of them, with the possible exception of the title track, could be considered hymns. Like other male crooners from the 1960s, Williams was portrayed as a bit of a swinger, but here when he sings the "Ave Maria" he sounds as pious and pure as an altar boy. In fact, the sensitive take is one of his best--if the "Ave Maria" isn't proof enough, give "What Child Is This" and "O Little Town of Bethlehem" a spin. Williams picks up the tempo a little bit with "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing," "Angels We Have Heard on High," and "Joy to the World." --Steve Gdula

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CD Reviews

Andy Williams plus 70's Music Schmaltz
alainsane | U.S. Canada | 06/27/2007
(3 out of 5 stars)

"I love Andy Williams' Christmas Album. It's my favorite Christmas album ever, so when I spotted a CD version of "Christmas Present," I jumped all over it. Unfortunately, while Andy's singing is still excellent, the album is troubled in spots by really bad 70's music production: "wacka wacka" guitars, heavy-handed basslines, and some hippie-dippie flute solos.

The good thing is that it doesn't persist across all the songs--the way it does with Dean Martin's later albums. Many of the songs have nicer baroquish guitars in them. For my money, I prefer the big beautiful band orchestrations of the 50's and 60's Christmas albums. If Amazon offered a half-point rating scale, I'd give this 3.5."