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The Young Feuerman
Antonin Dvorak, Max Bruch, Franz Joseph Haydn
The Young Feuerman
Genres: Special Interest, Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Emanuel Feuermann died at 39, but he is still remembered as perhaps the greatest cellist of them all. His big, burnished tone and unabashed emotionalism make his few recordings treasurable. The Dvo?ák dates from 1928-29, a...  more »

      
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Emanuel Feuermann died at 39, but he is still remembered as perhaps the greatest cellist of them all. His big, burnished tone and unabashed emotionalism make his few recordings treasurable. The Dvo?ák dates from 1928-29, and the 26-year-old cellist brings tremendous momentum to a dynamic performance that reaches its pinnacle in the beautifully phrased slow movement. This is uncommonly refined playing, enhanced by tonal variety beyond the reach of many cellists. The scrappy orchestra detracts from, but does not destroy, a must-hear performance. The Bruch gets better orchestral support, but the main attraction is Feuermann's golden tone, singing with powerful emotion. The fillers offer more immersion in the warm bath of Feuermann's tonal beauties. --Dan Davis

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CD Reviews

Amazing cello playing!
08/30/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"These performances on this CD are just about most brilliant cello playing one can ever encounter. Dvorak concerto is wonderfully paced, not at all like slow, morose performances one hears these days. Feuermann had technique and temperament to burn and the way he attacked difficult passages are nothing short of awesome. At the same time, in the slower sections, he plays with beautiful "bel-canto" style without being plodding or cloying. The other pieces are played superbly. The Haydn is bettered in the later version made in the 30's. Saint-Saen's "Allegro appasionato" truly deserved its name in Feuermann's hand, while Sarasate's "Zigeunerweisen"(alas, minus the fast section!)and Popper's "Hungarian Rhapsody" are played with overwhelming panache. The only snag I can think of is the quality of sound (especially in the Popper) and orchestral accompaniment. Sound is definitely not "hi-fi" and people who are not used to hearing old "scratchy" recording should stay away from this CD. Orchestral accompaniment is pretty scrappy and messy, although the piano accompanist is quite capable. For people who are willing to extract the incredible quality of these performances through dated sound, they will be rewarded splendidly. Connoisseur only!"