Search - Various Artists :: Spirit of 73: Rock for Choice

Spirit of 73: Rock for Choice
Various Artists
Spirit of 73: Rock for Choice
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

It's best not to be overly critical of good intentions. Take, for instance, Spirit of '73, a benefit compilation for the music industry's pro-abortion-rights organization, Rock for Choice. The album concept: songs by femal...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Spirit of 73: Rock for Choice
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 3
Label: Sony
Release Date: 8/8/1995
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock
Styles: Adult Contemporary, Singer-Songwriters, By Decade, 1990s, Adult Alternative
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 074646687925, 074646687949

Synopsis

Amazon.com
It's best not to be overly critical of good intentions. Take, for instance, Spirit of '73, a benefit compilation for the music industry's pro-abortion-rights organization, Rock for Choice. The album concept: songs by female or female-led acts of the '70s, the period of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, redone by female or female-led acts of today, with profits going to help pro-choice groups. A neat idea, particularly if you support the cause. Hear Spirit of '73 for what it's worth and you'll surely get a kick out of its more inspired remakes: Maria Muldaur's "Midnight at the Oasis" done with the wild harmonies and jangly guitars of L.A.'s that dog, and Olivia Newton-John's "Have You Never Been Mellow" given an alterna-reading by Pet. And you'll also appreciate Rosanne Cash's classy performance of Joni Mitchell's "River" and Cassandra Wilson's surprisingly effective take on Roberta Flack's "Killing Me Softly with His Song." But if you can't restrain your cynicism, you may conclude that most of the songs are pale copies of the originals; that the "'70s segue bits" (like the sound of a hair dryer or a waterbed) sprinkled between songs are incredibly dumb and unauthentic; that the record's politics are well-meaning but naive ("Circulate a petition," it suggests, as if the signatures of a few dozen 16-year-olds will make Newt Gingrich quake); and that, except for tracks like the sisterhood anthem "We Are Family," most of the covers provoke the question "What's the point?"--Roni Sarig

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CD Reviews

Generally Worthwhile Stuff
Alf Kremer | Denver CO | 12/04/1999
(3 out of 5 stars)

"70's female numbers done by 90's female artists. There's the story, and it works out about how you'd expect. Several of the numbers are killer - Eve's Plum doing "If I Can't Have You", Ebony Vibe Everlasting's gospelesque take on "We Are Family" - while others simply don't rate - Pet's "Have You Never Been Mellow". The disk seems to lose its drive about halfway through (I don't know how bad the 70's were, female-wise, but did they need TWO Roberta Flack numbers?). Probably worth the reduced price, whatever your political affillation."
Fun, fresh covers of oldies favorites
K. B. Lowry | Virginia, USA | 04/12/2005
(3 out of 5 stars)

"First of all, for the price of the album itself it's definately worth it!
Now the rest of my review will follow.
The entire album consists of covers of the top billboard songs of the decade that Roe v. Wade was past, the 1970's. This album is an effort on the part of Rock for Choice (formed by the Feminist Majority organization and the popular, femme rock band L7 in 1991) a Pro Choice / Pro Woman coalition of progressive female rock bands deciated for continuance of reproductive freedom. Most of the covers are extremely well done (normally I hate covers of oldies because so many of them aren't up to snuff with the originals). The bands that did the covers were mostly well chosen for the songs, exceptional performances include Eve's Plum, Babes in Toyland, Letters to Cleo, Ebony Vibe Everlasting, Johnette Napolitano, Melissa Ferrick and Sophie B. Hawkins. The rest are okay. Honestly, they aren't horrible, but they aren't better than the original or offer some uniqueness of their own merit. And the Sarah McLachlan's "Blue" seems like it was just thrown in there because Lilth Fair was just not cutting it for her that year.
Also, what's majorily annoying about the album is the little "mini clips" they've inserted into random tracks that resemble news or radio or nostalgic flash backs from the 70's. But their subject matter (a Berry White voice, a random chick bouncing around on a water bed, and the sound of a hair drier and hairspray [hey, that's 70's, right?]) isn't entertaining, it's just annoying. Would have been nice if they had actual news broad casts or parts of speeches from 1973 that would have unified the album together for the purpose of why the album was created: to celebrate Roe v. Wade."
Could go either way ...
K. B. Lowry | 04/16/2000
(2 out of 5 stars)

"Of the many tracks on this CD, there are only 3 good covers. However, they are really good covers, so if you have the space to store this CD you might want to get it. "If I Can't Have You" and "Dreams" are really well done, and "More More More" is a fun interpretation. There are millions of "Dancing Barefoot" covers in the world and they are all much better than the Johnette Napolitano version here. "Cherry Bomb" is a great song, but this version doesn't make much diversion from the original. Everything else is forgettable."