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Schoolhouse Rock: America Rock
Various Artists
Schoolhouse Rock: America Rock
Genres: Alternative Rock, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Soundtracks, Children's Music
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

The horn-backed swing of "Fireworks" will charm the ear of countless Gen-X listeners and their parents, as will most of this historically themed collection of songs from the ingeniously educational Schoolhouse Rock animati...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Schoolhouse Rock: America Rock
Members Wishing: 7
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rhino / Wea
Original Release Date: 4/1/1997
Release Date: 4/1/1997
Genres: Alternative Rock, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Soundtracks, Children's Music
Styles: Vocal Jazz, Bebop, Comedy & Spoken Word, Vocal Pop, Educational
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 081227261429

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The horn-backed swing of "Fireworks" will charm the ear of countless Gen-X listeners and their parents, as will most of this historically themed collection of songs from the ingeniously educational Schoolhouse Rock animations. Lyricists Lynn Ahrens and jazz vocal great Bob Dorough make fine yarns out of a (homogenized) overall narrative of the United States, which all seems pretty peachy in this context. This isn't a set to teach the nuances or vagaries of U.S. history, but "I'm Just a Bill" can leave kids in the single digits tracking the progress of legislation and asking what suffering and suffrage have to do with each other ("Sufferin' Till Suffrage") and inquiring about the Bill of Rights. The music is gentle but never silly or unlikable. Like that of the other volumes in the Schoolhouse Rock series, this CD's length is brief, but these themed packages seem to bear their pithy contents well. --Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

Schoolhouse Rock! sings about U.S. history and government
Lawrance M. Bernabo | The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota | 01/29/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"All right, boys and girls, here is a little ditty that has got to jog your memory if only you are old enough:I'm just a bill,
Yes, I'm only a bill,
And I'm sitting here on Capitol Hill.
Well, it's a long, long journey
To the capital city,
It's a long, long wait
While I'm sitting in committee,
But I know I'll be a law someday...
At least I hope and pray that I will,
But today I'm still just a bill."Schoolhouse Rock! America Rock" collects the soundtracks from the mini-cartoons ABC aired on the television in the mid-1970s and taught a generation of children about government and history (as well as grammar, science, and math in other rock counterparts). The ten America rocks are done in pretty much chronological order, with "No More Kings," "Fireworks" and "The Shot Heard 'Round the World" covering the founding of America, the Declaration of Independence, and the start of the American Revolution. I would be willing to bet that most of the kids in this country who can recite the Preamble to the Constitution learned it from "The Preamble" (or the "Star Trek" episode "The Omega Glory"). "Elbow Room" covers America going West while "The Great American Melting Pot" celebrates American diversity. Great American inventors get their due in "Mother Necessity" and "Sufferin' till Suffrage" covers women getting the right to vote. But the most popular one here has got to be "I'm Just a Bill," which explains how a bill comes a law in terms so simple that even a first term Congressman could understand it. "Three-Ring Government" explains the separation of powers between the three branches.Granted, American History might not lend itself to 3-minute lessons as well as basic principles of grammar or mathematics, but these are still so much fun, especially if you have the videos to show students instead of just playing them these tracks on the CD. Too bad there were not more of these (how would Schoolhouse Rock! have explained the Civil War or the Great Depression?), because they are just a lot of fun and then do a great job of driving a few essential points home in each lesson. "America Rock" is just the hook. It is up to history teachers and parents to provide the line. Even for more advanced students teachers can get some mileage out of these by showing them to students and either getting them to critique these (what inventors should be added?) or to be creative and write the script for their own (e.g., "I am here to provide an explanation of the Emancipation proclamation!")."
Hey, Do You Know About The USA?
Joe Smoe | 07/29/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I love these songs. My fifth grade social studies teacher taught us the
Preamble song, and now I'm going to sing the thing in the day camp talent show!!! Get this CD! It's worth the cash!"
No More Kings- An fun and educational tune/show!
Joe Smoe | NJ, USA | 11/04/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Jason Goode
Period 4
11/4/02 It was one of the most significant events in American History when the Americans revolutionized against the British. The Schoolhouse Rock version of this event, entitled "No More Kings", is very entertaining and educational for children between the ages of seven and ten. It was appropriate and fun for the following reasons. Firstly, the creators simplified the events, therefore making it easier for children to comprehend. Secondly, it is illustrated with humorous cartoons, so that it is fun to watch and listen to. In addition, it is simply is educational, and will give kids a jump start on American History. Lastly, since the song is shown on television, the events in history, such as the Boston Tea Party were drawn out. Visuals always help young children remember things. As parents or teachers can tell, "No More Kings" is a great way to get kids or students to learn our country's history while having fun."