Search - Various Artists :: Pure Funk 2

Pure Funk 2
Various Artists
Pure Funk 2
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (20) - Disc #1


      
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Pure Funk 2
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Utv Records
Original Release Date: 5/4/1999
Release Date: 5/4/1999
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Pop, R&B
Styles: Disco, By Decade, 1970s, Funk, Soul, Quiet Storm
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731456555027, 731456555041

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CD Reviews

Pure non funk 2
Sherance M. Brothers | Jasper, Alabama United States | 10/09/2001
(2 out of 5 stars)

"funk is that kinda vibe you eat hotwings and groove at fish fries funk is when you come out of church's chicken jamming, sorry but half this cd is not funk, d train is bubblegum pop, gap band outstanding is not funky enough, but hits, why is queen on here they was not a funk group, the whispers no way hose, carl carlton's she's a bad mama jama is not a funk classic, i always said these funk compilations does the artists injustice, if you wanna learn what funk is check out the original recordings well i'll list a few, the entire catalog, and entourage of james brown, parliament-funkadelic, sly stone, larry graham, bootsy collins, barkays, ohio players, chaka khan and rufus, cameo,curtis mayfield, mandrill, earth, wind fire, war, the list is endless."
Soft and commercial
dom_w | the UK | 12/21/2001
(1 out of 5 stars)

"Seems like they sold too many of the first volume, and have produced a second just to try to rake in a little more. Hardly any of the tracks on this album are funk, and as for Queen being the opener... it speaks for itself. To me, funk is typified by an active bass line, compelling beat and sharp guitar or brass; any or all of these are lacking on most of the tracks here. What you get instead is a collection of slothful, disparate songs, hardly conducive to dancing. Save your money."
Controversial second effort from the Pure Funk series
L. Hawkins | USA | 10/12/2004
(3 out of 5 stars)

"The second and more controversial disc in the Pure Funk series, Pure Funk Vol. 2 contains many Funk band and Funk artist's slightly lesser known hits plus a few from groups not immediately recognizable as masters of Funk. The songs are a bit slower in tempo and might be a better album to play at the end of the night when the party is winding down -- not when you want to crank things up.

There are a few highlights, however. One can't help but recall the local boys feeble attempts at stripping in the movie "The Full Monty" whenever Hot Chocolate's "You Sexy Thing" begins. While Queen certainly wasn't a Funk band by anyone's stretch of imagination, they did write one excellent, kickin' base line for "Another One Bites The Dust" that's instantly recognizable anywhere and would make any Funk band proud to call their own! Stomp twice on the bleachers and clap! Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give It Up" is always a crowd pleaser and Barry White proves once again in "I'm gonna Love You Just a Little More" that the deep voice gets the girl.

For those not of the `Keep on Truckin'' generation, you'll discover the origin of many samples from your favorite songs (you mean they didn't write that rif themselves?!?!) plus you'll discover what song the Spice Girls ripped off for their album Spice World. Hint: She's a Bad Mama Jama . . . . Just don't tell anyone you think all of this stuff is funk, because it's not. That doesn't mean you won't enjoy the album as much as I did, just know that the first Pure Funk album is a better `Funk primer.'

Like the first Pure Funk album, not everything is from the 70's funk era -- half of the songs in fact. "Let It Whip" by Dazz Band, "Ain't Nobody" from Rufus & Chaka Khan, D Train's "You're The One For Me," The Gap Band's "Outstanding" were all early to mid 80's hits. "Get Down On It" by Kool & The Gang, The Whispers "It's a Love Thing," Rick James' "Give it to Me Baby," Carl Carlton's "She's a Bad Mama Jama," and Junior's "Mama Used to Say" were all released in the year 1981.

Twenty songs for ten bucks -- that's 50 cents a song. If you delete the songs on the album you don't consider "Funk," you're only out a few bucks. Buy this album only after you get the first album first."