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Friar Tut
Tut Taylor
Friar Tut
Genres: Country, Folk, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (17) - Disc #1

Since Brother Oswald Kirby popularized the Dobro in his work with Roy Acuff, there have been a select few players to stand out on the instrument: Josh Graves, Mike Auldridge, Jerry Douglas, and Tut Taylor. Although Tayl...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Tut Taylor
Title: Friar Tut
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rounder Select
Release Date: 7/14/1998
Genres: Country, Folk, Pop
Styles: Bluegrass, Classic Country, Traditional Folk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 011661001121, 011661001114

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Since Brother Oswald Kirby popularized the Dobro in his work with Roy Acuff, there have been a select few players to stand out on the instrument: Josh Graves, Mike Auldridge, Jerry Douglas, and Tut Taylor. Although Taylor often joined with more-progressive minds such as John Hartford, his passion is for the traditional, old-timey sounds of Brother Oswald. Recorded in 1971, Friar Tut focuses on the warmer, mellower tones of the Dobro, mostly in the context of duets with guitarist Norman Blake (another Hartford sideman). Exceptions include two mandolin trios (with Sam Bush rounding out the group) and a hot-picking tribute to Graves. Even though he uses a flat pick (rare for the instrument), Taylor coaxes a wonderfully soft and welcoming tone from the Dobro on this delightfully understated reissue. --Marc Greilsamer
 

CD Reviews

GOOD BUT BETTER
Andrew J. Alexander | AUSTRALIA | 02/13/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"THIS IS TRUE TUT AND POSSIBLY THE BEST SOLO EXAMPLE OF HIS STYLE. OF COURSE, IF YOU THINK THIS IS HIGH PRAISE, WAIT FOR THE CD (RE) RELEASE OF HIS WORK WITH BUTCH ROBBINS, NORMAN BLAKE, DAVE HOLLAND AND VASSAR CLEMMENS. OVER TO YOU AMAZON!"
Simple but perfect
Nobody important | 07/09/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I keep coming back to this old gem. Tut Taylor is known as "the flat-pickin' dobro man." Most dobro players use a variation of Earl Scruggs' three-finger banjo picking style, with banjo fingerpicks. Tut is different. He uses a regular, old-fashioned guitar pick. That may sound limiting, and to be sure, Tut doesn't create the same kind of deluge of notes that Jerry Douglas or Rob Ickes does, but what really matters is which notes you play, not how many notes you play. Tut knows all the right notes, and he plays with a strong blues feeling that can be lacking from some of the overly-polished modern bluegrass. This is the perfect, stripped-down Tut recording, with backup provided mostly by just Norman Blake and Sam Bush. Don't let Sam's presence fool you, though. This is not a progressive, newgrass recording. It is closer to the old-timey sounds that Norman Blake usually plays, although much more up-beat than the type of music Norman has been recording in recent years. If you want to know how Doc Watson might sound on a Dobro, this is your chance.

Tut has a number of other recordings in this type of intimate setting, including a duet album with Norman Blake, and one with Clarence White. Both are good, but Friar Tut is his classic."