Search - Susannah Mccorkle :: How Do You Keep the Music Playing?

How Do You Keep the Music Playing?
Susannah Mccorkle
How Do You Keep the Music Playing?
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

It's not just Susannah McCorkle's smoky sensuality that grabs a listener. It's her wit and literacy, her jazz sensibilities and constant inventiveness in interpreting America's great popular songs. All those strengths stoo...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Susannah Mccorkle
Title: How Do You Keep the Music Playing?
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Jazz Alliance
Release Date: 2/22/2000
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Traditional Jazz & Ragtime, Vocal Jazz, Easy Listening, Oldies, Vocal Pop, Traditional Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 727489003628

Synopsis

Amazon.com
It's not just Susannah McCorkle's smoky sensuality that grabs a listener. It's her wit and literacy, her jazz sensibilities and constant inventiveness in interpreting America's great popular songs. All those strengths stood out on this 1985 LP, issued here on CD for the first time. She created flawless tension and atmosphere on "While the City Sleeps" from the musical Golden Boy. By slowing "There's No Business Like Show Business" to a more contemplative tempo, she gained the space to plumb the underlying--and seldom explored--melancholy of Irving Berlin's lyrics. Similarly, she confers a level of majesty and humanity on Jim Webb's country-pop standard "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" that Glen Campbell's 1967 hit version can't match. Defining a song on both its terms and her own is one of her consistent strengths, be it "Where or When" or Dave Frishberg's sarcastic, satirical "Blizzard of Lies." "Outra Vez" reveals the mastery of Brazilian song she later explored in greater depth. Indeed, the entire album reveals McCorkle's talents fully formed, a harbinger of the excellence that followed. --Rich Kienzle

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CD Reviews

The music will play on
Don A. Frascinella | The City By The Bay, USA | 10/01/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Due to her tragic death, Susannah's music was stilled but has not stopped. Through her CDs, she manages to keep the music playing for us.Susannah's interpretations of songs continue to impress me. The highlight on this one is "There's No Business Like Show Business". But it is a far cry from the Ethel Merman version. Whereas that one was a celebration and joy of show business, Susannah's version is a sad, depressing rendition which shows the pain and heartbreak of show business, such as which she might have experienced.Susannah also shows her ability to give a new read to "By the Time I Get to Phoenix", and gives it a more winsome spin than does Glenn Campbell. The title track "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?" is a question that we might have asked Susannah. Perhaps she is talking directly to us. The CD also has the usual effort from Dave Frishberg, "Blizzard of Lies". "Ain't Safe to Go Nowhere" is a something we are all thinking today and Susannah's smokey lyric almost sees into the future.Of course, Susannah was a whiz at handling all types of material and she proved it on this CD. Even though she is no longer with us, the wonderful music keeps playing."
Susannah McCorkle, "How Do You Keep The Music Playing"
Don A. Frascinella | 02/23/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Exquisite Jazz Voacalization! That is for starters. She is so reminisicent of the great female vocalist of late 1950s and early 1960s. Her phrasing leaves nothing to be desired and the instrumentalist backing her singing are very adept and easy on the ear. Put all this together on a Bose or any other fine sound system and you are in for a wonderful musical experience. Best dollars spent in a long long time and I know as I am 74 years of age."
Sweet and charming
B. Holder | Cedar Crest, NM United States | 08/04/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Susannah made this CD in 1985, when her voice was sweet and charming, before the sadness crept in. She's been gone now for almost three months, and in that time I hadn't played this recording. It's really hard to "rate" the performance of someone who eventually took her own life, but this really IS a pretty, almost delicate album. "Ain't Safe To Go Nowhere" is my favorite cut, Susannah's vocal good-natured without a touch of sarcasm. This CD also includes "Outra Vez", an Antonio Carlos Jobim song sung as only Susannah could, and George Gershwin's "Slap That Bass". I'm giving this CD 5-stars for Susannah's sincerity and because, she cannot be duplicated."