Search - Sonny Terry :: His Mouth Harp

His Mouth Harp
Sonny Terry
His Mouth Harp
Genres: Country, Blues, Folk, Pop
 
This 1999 reissue will be a treat for those who only know Sonny Terry's duo work with partner Brownie McGhee. Not that it's a huge departure, but Terry was always the coarser, more visceral performer and for this reason it...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Sonny Terry
Title: His Mouth Harp
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Obc
Release Date: 7/20/1999
Genres: Country, Blues, Folk, Pop
Styles: Classic Country, Delta Blues, Traditional Blues, Harmonica Blues, Traditional Folk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 025218058926, 025218058926

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This 1999 reissue will be a treat for those who only know Sonny Terry's duo work with partner Brownie McGhee. Not that it's a huge departure, but Terry was always the coarser, more visceral performer and for this reason it's a welcome change to have him center stage. Alec Seward provides the spare understated guitar support on this 1953 obscurity, but it's Terry's show all the way through. His acrobatic harmonica and accompanying vocal whoops are rightfully what made him famous, but his thick, grainy singing voice and primal, organic vocal delivery are nearly as powerful. Here he tackles a few tunes from the country-blues tradition, notably "John Henry" and "The Fox Chase" (the latter inspired, like much of Terry's work, by the old Grand Ole Opry harp player DeFord Bailey), plus an endearing ode to his old pal Leadbelly. --Marc Greilsamer

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CD Reviews

The master
Chris Johnson | 07/25/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If I had a time machine, one of the first things I'd go see would be John Hammond's 1938 "Spirituals to Swing" concert. I would have given anything to be able to see Sonny Terry alone on the Carnegie Hall stage with just his harp.This album is about as close as we'll get to that wonderful image. With minimal guitar accompaniment, Sonny showed here why'd I'd rather listen to people like him than any other harmonica player you could name. Sonny Terry may not have had the musical dexterity of some later(OK, white)harp players. He may not have played the harp like Charlie Parker played the sax. But his music had something in back of it that was far more important. Real life."