Search - Shabba Ranks :: As Raw As Ever

As Raw As Ever
Shabba Ranks
As Raw As Ever
Genres: World Music, Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Shabba's 1991 Epic Records debut captures the sophistication of his roughneck reggae style, although Jamaica's breakout dancehall deejay (rapper) voiced his best efforts before signing to the American label and being marke...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Shabba Ranks
Title: As Raw As Ever
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 4
Label: Sony
Original Release Date: 5/21/1991
Release Date: 5/21/1991
Genres: World Music, Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop
Styles: Caribbean & Cuba, Jamaica, Reggae, Pop Rap
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 074644731026, 016161200418, 074644731019, 074644731040, 074644731088

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Shabba's 1991 Epic Records debut captures the sophistication of his roughneck reggae style, although Jamaica's breakout dancehall deejay (rapper) voiced his best efforts before signing to the American label and being marketed as an X-rated buffoon. The two tracks where his eye is shamelessly fixed on the R&B/hip-hop crossover prize--"The Jam" with KRS-1 and "Housecall" with Maxi Priest--are the only artistic failures, though "Housecall" did well as a single. On his own for the rest of the cuts, Shabba proves himself to be a languid yet keen styler of time. In tunes like the album's lead single, "Trailor Load A Girls" and "Gun Pon Me," he drops rhymes with artillery precision, while blanketing the tinny drum machine beats and computer game mixing board F/X with that unmistakable chesty bass. --Elena Oumano

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CD Reviews

RAPPIN' & ROLLIN'
Pieter | Johannesburg | 07/11/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Trailer Load A Girls triggers off a rollercoaster of rhythms and rap, mostly unintelligible. Gun Pon Me and Flesh Axe are particularly raucous, the former's only discernible words being "jezebel, prostitute, mongrel" and there's a definite preoccupation with ladies throughout, as evidenced by titles like Woman Tangle and A Mi Di Girls Dem Love. Maxi Priest lends some respectability as he duets with Shabba on the radio-friendly Housecall, while the closing track, The Jam, features KRS-1 of Boogie Down Productions. Shabba rants about his hero Yellowman on Where Does Slackness Come From?, and about blue movies and reality, casually dropping profundities like "Me I went to high school/Was once a prefect/Took some great subjects English and mathematics/But my greatest subject was sex." (Fist-A-Ris). As subtle as an air raid yet affectionate in a naive sort of way. It's all the excitement of ska and early reggae returned, infused with a very positive vibration."
Sweet Dancehall Rythms!!!!
Pieter | 08/11/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The entire CD is slammin' with good dancehall. It's not all "sooped" up to be a cross-over pop hit. It's one of Shabba's best. The tracks are not necessarily hardcore, but the beats the lyrics and Shabba's "gruff" voice set the CD off lovely. A must have CD for all the dancehall junkie's out there."
Mista Ugly Man... Shabbaaaaaa!
Lord Jimson | D.C. Area | 11/10/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Buy this album for "The Jam" if nothing else. It is hands down the best hip-hop dancehall collabo EVER. I used to rock this tape on the bus back in junior high and it's still in heavy rotation... However, Maxi Priest Sucks!!!"