Search - Seekers :: Seen in Green

Seen in Green
Seekers
Seen in Green
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (24) - Disc #1

Digitally remastered reissue of the hit Australian pop group's 1967 album for EMI. Housed in a digipak with a gatefold lid, it contains the original cover art and both mono & stereo versions of the original release's 12 cu...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Seekers
Title: Seen in Green
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Release Date: 5/10/1999
Album Type: Import
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Easy Listening, Oldies, Folk Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 724352013227

Synopsis

Album Description
Digitally remastered reissue of the hit Australian pop group's 1967 album for EMI. Housed in a digipak with a gatefold lid, it contains the original cover art and both mono & stereo versions of the original release's 12 cuts, for a total of 24 selections.
 

CD Reviews

Gorgeous
J. Lawson | Springfield, MO United States | 07/20/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Being only familiar with the big hits of the Seekers (Georgy Girl, I'll Never Find Another You, etc.), I wasn't sure what I'd be getting myself into with "Seen In Green." Luckily, I took the chance, and found myself with one of my favorite CD's of all time. Judith Durham's voice has a haunting quality that you never quite get over, and the production on this CD is stunning."
Enchanting
David Saemann | 06/19/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Some writers have called the 1967 Seen in Green the Seekers's Sgt. Pepper. Comparisons may be invidious, but this album is a tremendous accomplishment. There are songs on the album written by three of the Seekers, Judith Durham, Keith Potger, and Bruce Woodley. My favorite performance on the album is Bruce Woodley's solo in Angeline is Always Friday, a pensive, lyrical song about young love. Years later, Woodley would write a song called Streets of Serenade, commemorating the Seekers's youthful years in their careers. From the songs on this album, you really feel that the Seekers were in love with what they did. The weakest number perhaps is Judith Duham's solo on the Jacques Brel/Rod McKuen number If You Go Away, which was covered by so many artists at the time. Her performance is perfectly good, but her youthfulness acts against the experience of the song's persona. Still, this is a wonderful album by a group that was around for too brief a time."