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Songs of Love and Parting
Robin Williamson
Songs of Love and Parting
Genres: Folk, World Music, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (18) - Disc #1

2008 release. Originally released in 1981, Songs Of Love And Parting' was Robin's first solo album after the amicable demise of the Merry Band. All songs were written by Robin (with a few traditional tunes thrown in for go...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Robin Williamson
Title: Songs of Love and Parting
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: BGO Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 1/1/1995
Album Type: Import
Genres: Folk, World Music, Rock
Styles: British & Celtic Folk, Celtic, Europe, British Isles, Folk Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
2008 release. Originally released in 1981, Songs Of Love And Parting' was Robin's first solo album after the amicable demise of the Merry Band. All songs were written by Robin (with a few traditional tunes thrown in for good measure!) and are now regarded by many as his finest compositions. Around the same time, Robin released a cassette of songs and poetry titled Selected Writings which was only ever sold at concerts.

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CD Reviews

Williamson's best work on a single CD
Craig Brandon | Surry, NH United States | 10/05/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Is there anything more frustrating than being a Robin Williamson fan?

At his best he is a lyrical, magical poet seeming to overflow with creativity. At his worst he is a screeching, howling madman producing music that is truly unlistenable.

For the newcomer, this collection contains some of his best work and many of my favorites. The "Songs of Love and Parting" LP was worn out on my turntable when it first came out. From the nostalgic romance of "Verses in Stewart Street" to the truly magical Celtic mystery of "Flower of the Briar" and the unusually slow and pensive "Parting Glass."

If you have never heard of Williamson, this is where to start. If you are an old friend, it's great to have this music back on CD.
The special bonus here is his poetry set to music that was originally available only on cassette at his concerts and was later available as part of a different CD compliation.

This includes one of the most haunting bits of Celticism ever produced, the "Song of Mabon," which always sounded to me like an ancient Druidic rite that had been captured thousands of years ago and somehow channeled by Robin.

Robin has many personnas and is full of contradictions. He is a Celtic bard, but also a Scientologist! He has a stunningly lyrical voice that he can suddenly shatter into passionate dissonance. He is an accomplished multi-instrumentalist. He is a wonderful poet who isn't above writing a bit of doggeral now and then.

My wife hates his voice and runs from the room when I put him on, as do many of my friends. So I put on the headphones or enjoy this music alone in my car. If you have any love of Celticism, poetry or folk music, this is the CD to try. If you hate it, you can always sell it on Ebay.
"
Songs of Love and Parting
Paul Del Vecchio | Oakland, CA USA | 02/12/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This collection, "Songs of Love and Parting", together with "A Glint at the Kindling", represent the best outpouring of a remarkable artist, who is also unfortunately remarkably inconsistent.When Robin hits his mark as he does in these two albums, he pulls forth from guts and sinew a richness of imagery and transendence that inspires awe at the very bone.This album,"Songs of Love and Parting", is the tree in leaf, as "Glint" is the tree in flame. Together they reveal a man who is more than artist, whose connection to the past and his reverence of the miracle of our lives seem to scream from him perhaps unbidden from some wellspring or resource, "a burden and a turn", horrible and compelling, that will not be denied."Where wild geese cry accross the sky like voices on the air; and the midnight dark is in her eyes and the night is on her hair."If you have perhaps happened upon some of his less remarkable works, I suggest you visit Robin again with these two works."