Search - Richard Wright :: Wet Dream

Wet Dream
Richard Wright
Wet Dream
Genres: New Age, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1


      
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CD Details

All Artists: Richard Wright
Title: Wet Dream
Members Wishing: 13
Total Copies: 0
Label: One Way Records Inc
Release Date: 8/10/1993
Genres: New Age, Pop, Rock
Styles: Progressive, Progressive Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 079892409024

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CD Reviews

Surprisingly good.
Augustus Caesar, Ph.D. | Eugene, Oregon United States | 06/10/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Rick Wright, Pink Floyd's keyboardist and (many forget) co-writer of some of their best-known songs, makes his solo debut here on "Wet Dream," a laid back, melodic, atmospheric jazz-inflected pop record. This album not only offers a very pleasurable listening experience (while breaking no ground musically), but also offers insight into something too often overlooked by Floyd fans: Wright's importance as a composer/musician in creating the classic Floyd sound of "Dark Side" and "Wish You Were Here." One only has to listen to the later Floyd records on which Wright had little or no involvement ("The Wall" and "The Final Cut") to see how different their music sounded. And while there was fine stuff on both "The Wall" and "The Final Cut," most Floyd fans would agree that their peak in creativity was between '73 and '75--the years when Rick Wright was a key player in forming the Pink Floyd sound. I recommend this album highly as a must-have for Floyd fans and as an accomplished musical statement in itself."
PAY NO ATTENTION TO THOSE YO-YOS
maxxroach | felona's big blue bacalada | 09/01/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I agree this the best solo release from the post- BARRETT lineup. All the other FLOYD members solo works including FINAL CUT don't hold up to this one. Pay no mind to those guys ragging on this great album. One must have aptitude for atmospheric soundscapes such as this, as it tends to come apart from the standard FLOYD fare of the 70's a bit with its smooth jazz (a misnomer, KENNY G is not jazz) style. MEL COLLINS blows KENNY G. away, pun intended. A few weak moments, made up for by the hypnotic instrumental cuts. Very different from WATER'S concept fare he was developing at the time of WET DREAM release, This album is more geared to the enthusiasts of WRIGHT'S earlier FLOYD instrumentals like GREAT GIG IN THE SKY and the spectacular but often looked over cut MUDMEN from OBSCURED BY CLOUDS. WATERS FANATICS, KEEP YOUR FINAL CUT. MUSIC FANS, CHECK THIS OUT. WRIGHT'S penchant for writing music with some charachter and depth to it easily outshines WATER'S dry, superficial idea of an album based almost entirely on concept. He must have been a kook to sever relations with one RICHARD WRIGHT."
Mellow and moody
William de Luca | Willemstad, Curacao Netherlands Antilles | 03/09/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Okay, this is not exactly Pink Floyd; it's Richard Wright trying to do his own thing. The average Pink Floyd fan will have some kind of deja-vu feeling. Yep!! Pink Floyd's "Shine on you crazy diamond" on the album "Wish you were here" and "Dark side of the moon" in general. But this is definetely Richard Wright. Surrounding himself by a couple of great studio musicians he succeeded in creating a very atmospheric album. Just listen to Cat Suite. Snowy White might not be a great composer, but he surely knows how to handle his guitar. The same is true for Mel Collins on sax. Who does not not know him? implicitly or explicitly? The sax intro on "Baker Street" by Gerry Rafferty? Several recordings with Alan Parsons and also former member of Camel. Just to mention a few. Together with these guys Ric managed to give birth to an album that might not be innovative, but surely pleasant to listen to. Mellow and moody; but never boring. "Wet Dream" is certainly more digestable, less intense, than the average Pink Floyd and it won't really bother me while having breakfast. I happen to own the vinyl version since 1979. Now I purchased the CD. Do I need to say more? I wonder what took him so long to come up with some new work, after his Zee-project with Harris in the first half of the eighties."