Search - Alonso de Mudarra, Peter [composer] Philips, Francesco (da Milano) Canova :: The Renaissance Album

The Renaissance Album
Alonso de Mudarra, Peter [composer] Philips, Francesco (da Milano) Canova
The Renaissance Album
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Special Interest, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (34) - Disc #1

This New Project from Goran Sollscher is a Follow-up to his Previous CD, the Highly Successful 'eleven-string Baroque'. With the Balanced Sound of Sollscher's Eleven-string Guitar Combined with the Baroque Repertoire, the ...  more »

      
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Synopsis

Album Details
This New Project from Goran Sollscher is a Follow-up to his Previous CD, the Highly Successful 'eleven-string Baroque'. With the Balanced Sound of Sollscher's Eleven-string Guitar Combined with the Baroque Repertoire, the Album Spoke to Not Only his Fans but also a Wider Audience Craving Relaxing Music and Congenial Guitar Sounds. In this Same Spirit, Sollscher's Upcoming Renaissance Album Can Be Marketed to a Wide Audience Including Both his Fans and New Listeners in Search of Dreamy, Soothing Renaissance Melodies. The Stylish Cover Artwork Emphasizes Both the Freshness and Universality of Sollscher's Art.the Album Contains Renaissance Lute Masterpieces by Various Composers from Italy, Spain, Germany, France and England, the Most Popular of which were Written by John Dowland. Söllscher Delivers a Dozen of Tracks by Dowland, a Composer who Embodies the 'golden Age' of English Lute Music.
 

CD Reviews

Master of lute music
Paul Magnussen | Campbell, CA USA | 12/07/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album takes the playing of Renaissance music on the guitar to a new level.

Transcriptions from the Renaissance lute (and its cousin, the vihuela) formed a staple of the guitar repertory from the advent of Segovia (which is to say the 1920s) well through the 1960s; to the extent that few guitar recordings (and even fewer recitals) did not start with a few such pieces. These transcriptions were considerably facilitated by the facts that the lute until around 1580 had six or fewer courses (string pairs), and its tuning could be simulated by merely tuning the third string of the guitar down a semitone (although Segovia, characteristically, didn't bother).

Around the start of the 17th century, however, the lute started acquiring extra bass strings, so that the resulting pieces can no longer be played on a standard guitar without mutilation. This, and more particularly a strong revival of interest both in the lute itself (spearheaded by Julian Bream) and in historical "authenticity", has resulted in the almost total eclipse of Renaissance lute music in guitar recitals.

Until Göran Söllscher, that is. For Mr Söllscher is one of the few guitarists in the World to play an 11-string alto guitar constructed by Georg Bolin; and the result of that combination, whether Greensleeves or Bach, is simply magnificent.

The present album is a tribute to the late Per-Olof Johnson, the Julian Bream of Sweden and the artist's teacher. He it was who in the 1960s collaborated with Bolin to develop the alto guitar, explicitly to explore the lute repertory.

Söllscher's playing does in fact remind me of Bream's brilliant but now-aging recording's from the 60s -- and properly so, for no one understood this music like Bream.

For me, this was easily the best release of 2005 in any genre: well over an hour, and not a single bad track. When it comes to lute music, you can't go wrong with Söllscher.

P.S. For Dowland fans, the particular Fantasia played here is P.1, and "A Piece Without Title" is P.78."