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Peace & Love
Pogues
Peace & Love
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, World Music, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

Deleted in the U.S., this is their 1989 studio album, produced by the legendary Steve Lillywhite (U2, Big Country, Psychedelic Furs, Simple Minds, etc.). 14 tracks, including 'Gridlock', 'Young Ned Of The Hill' & 'Lorelei'...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Pogues
Title: Peace & Love
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Warner Bros UK
Release Date: 6/30/1998
Album Type: Import
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, World Music, Pop, Rock
Styles: Hardcore & Punk, Traditional Folk, British & Celtic Folk, Celtic, Folk Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 022924608629, 766482745524

Synopsis

Album Description
Deleted in the U.S., this is their 1989 studio album, produced by the legendary Steve Lillywhite (U2, Big Country, Psychedelic Furs, Simple Minds, etc.). 14 tracks, including 'Gridlock', 'Young Ned Of The Hill' & 'Lorelei'. A WEA International release.

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Member CD Reviews

Charles N. from ALEXANDRIA, VA
Reviewed on 5/27/2010...
Rreally good CD, though not quite the classic of their previous effort, "If I Should Fall From Grace With God." "Young Bed of the Hill" is one of the best Pogues songs ever, and it's clear they were trying to expand their horizons with this CD. Pick it up if you like the Pogues at all (it's much better than anything they made after later).

CD Reviews

A step closer to drunken uselessness, but still great.
Greekfreak | 04/14/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The Pogues are still one of the only bands I've formes a personal relationship with (the kind whose songs pop into your head during important time sin your life) and this album is the third reason why, ranking just after "Rum..." and "...Grace with God" (both five star classics).Here, a few bona-fide classics (USA, Down All the Days, Night Train to Lorca) are surrounded by some well-played but uninspired tracks that occasionally veer toward the insipid (My Blue Heaven, Cotton Fields).Face it, The Pogues aren't exciting without Shane Mcgowan at the helm. Here, while they sound awful nice, the others that step to the mic seem to adopt a sort of pompous tone. I'll take drunken slobberiness before pomposity any day.Whne McGowan uses his by now-deepening gurgle to good effect, in slow cadence, or in tandem with someone else, the band smokes. When he relinquishes it and passes out on the couch, the album loses steam (notable exception: Lorelei).Still, certain powerful emotions (sadness, anger, fear, longing) are the themes that still drive what these guys were doing. When they pull it off, they created the best Irish-inflected-rock I've ever heard."
Eclectic, Mondial, and yes! It Works!
Greekfreak | Pusan Korea (South) | 07/07/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Strangely enough, the mix of world music stew you find on this album works rather well, and at a time when they might have been stumped for new material, this is a better album than most critics will admit.For one thing, Jem Finer and Andrew Rankin step up on the songwriting duties; "Misty Morning, Albert Bridge" is a classic Pogues tune that even Shane with his worsening voice could not ruin. Kirsty MacColl is back on board with the beautifully soaring "Lorelei". McGowan himself isn't up to par, but still shows some flashes of classic brilliance--"London, You're A Lady" being one of the best.The Jazz, fusion, and samba beats might jar a few listeners, but it's a pretty cohesive album that slips under your skin in no time at all. Well worth owning, and far better than the follow-up "Hell's Ditch"."