Search - Plasmatics :: New Hope for the Wretched

New Hope for the Wretched
Plasmatics
New Hope for the Wretched
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (15) - Disc #1

The 1980 debut for Stiff by one of the more bizarre bands toarise during rock's revolutionary period of the late '70s & early '80s, the punk/ metal hybrid Plasmatics. 15 tracks, including the underground hit 'Butcher Baby'...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Plasmatics
Title: New Hope for the Wretched
Members Wishing: 5
Total Copies: 0
Label: Repertoire
Release Date: 9/16/1998
Album Type: Extra tracks, Import
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Metal
Styles: Hardcore & Punk, New Wave & Post-Punk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 4009910439425, 502163010792, 766482705221, 766488579727

Synopsis

Album Description
The 1980 debut for Stiff by one of the more bizarre bands toarise during rock's revolutionary period of the late '70s & early '80s, the punk/ metal hybrid Plasmatics. 15 tracks, including the underground hit 'Butcher Baby', plus live versions of 'Tiger Black Pants', 'Living Dead' & 'Sometimes I' added as bonus tracks. 1993 reissue on Repertoire.

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CD Reviews

Timeless classic!
Skipper Zipper | Redmond, WA USA | 12/17/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"It's true, this is THE most under-rated band of all time. The first true crossover band fusing punk & metal. You may laugh at that but you have to keep in mind that this album came out in 1980 when punks and metalheads were diametrically opposed. I was the only person I knew of that liked (or at least would admit to liking) the Plasmatics at the time. Punks did'nt take them seriously thinking they were too metal, and metalheads certainly did'nt like them. Only truly open minded individuals *got* them. And yeah, it's true, they were always trashed in the rock press by silly pretentious critics. Now that all their stuff has been re-released on CD they are finally starting to recieve some acclaim. They were truly an act ahead of it's time. This is their best album in my opinion. It's near perfect in every respect, fast, furious, hard, raw, and incendiary with Richie Stotts buzzsaw guitars and Wendy's gutteral vocals. The extra tracks are 3 live songs that were included as b-sides on various singles. I recommend all their CD's, but if you only buy one, start with this one."
Great first album from the heaviest rock band ever!
Skipper Zipper | 10/22/1998
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is NOT FOR EVERYONE, but it's a great ice-breaker at parties, the quintessential head-banging record. Wendy's singing is less hoarse than later efforts, but just as guttural and raunchy. The playing, especially the guitar, is tight and furiously manic. The centerpiece of the album, well worth the price alone, is their cover of Bobby Darin's "Dream Lover." You have to hear it to believe it! Another stand-out is "Won't You" (P-S-Y-C-H-O!!!)"
A Must-own
Greekfreak | Pusan Korea (South) | 12/06/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The Plasmatics became famous to me way before I ever heard them on record. They were all my brother would rave about when he picked up 'New Hope For the Wretched', and all he would play soon thereafter. Back then I thought he was nuts, but years later I had to tip my hat to him. I was in need of a speed-punk rock'n'roll record, and I came across this import copy on Amazon. From the opening chords of 'Tight Black Pants', I knew I had it all wrong at age six. This stuff is and was pure genius of the punk order.As with the Ramones, it's not technically impressive, but the conviction of the band is put forth immediately, and they never stop. Special props go to Richie Stotts and his one-note leads, which put him on equal footing with Johnny Thunders and Steve Jones for sheer attitude, and Stu Deutch's enviable bass-playing, which is what keeps this album rocking all the way through.The bonus tracks are fine, if negligible... they don't take away from any of the originals, if that's what you may be worried about. Be warned, however; this album is not representative of the Plasmatics later material (which would become more metal than thrash), and in fact is smarter and a lot more fun than anything they'd release subsequently."