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Cold Blow & The Rainy Night
Planxty
Cold Blow & The Rainy Night
Genres: Folk, World Music, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

Cold Blow and the Rainy Night was the third and final Planxty recording before the band's members split off to form the Bothy Band, Moving Hearts, and De Dannan. It was as if the implications of their revolutionary blendin...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Planxty
Title: Cold Blow & The Rainy Night
Members Wishing: 7
Total Copies: 0
Label: Shanachie
Release Date: 11/6/1989
Genres: Folk, World Music, Pop
Styles: Traditional Folk, British & Celtic Folk, Celtic, Europe, British Isles
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 016351791122, 016351791115, 016351791146, 669910095157

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Cold Blow and the Rainy Night was the third and final Planxty recording before the band's members split off to form the Bothy Band, Moving Hearts, and De Dannan. It was as if the implications of their revolutionary blending of the instrumental and vocal strains of Irish music were too profound to be contained in one band. You can hear the future of Celtic music being charted on this record. Elements that are now commonplace, like mixing traditional uilleann pipes and fiddles with modern guitars, bouzoukis, and mandolins; performing tunes from other cultures; and making medleys from dance tunes and songs; were all popularized by Planxty in its formative years. The group reformed a few years later, but they were never able to recapture the magic of their early years. --Michael Simmons

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CD Reviews

Classic Celtic Revival Disc!
Carl D. Finley | El Cerrito, CA | 08/17/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Founded in 1972, Planxty was the most innovative band on the Irish scene in the '70s, featuring unusual instrumentation (harmonium, hurdy-gurdy and mandolin family instruments alongside the traditional uillean pipes, whistle and bodhran and customary guitar) and striking song settings."Cold Blow and the Rainy Night" was the last album Planxty recorded before breaking up in 1975. Donal Lunny had left by this point, but contributes some bouzouki and portative organ as well as handling production chores. His replacement on this disc is the woefully under-appreciated Johnny Moynihan, who introduced the bouzouki to Irish music in 1965 with the landmark group Sweeney's Men. His distinctive nasal vocals well-serve the songs on which he is featured: "P Stands for Paddy" and "The Frost is All Over". Diversity of tone and timbre was one of Planxty's great achievements, particularly evident in the vocal arrangements. Christy Moore's naturally rich baritone delivers "Cold Blow and the Rainy Night", "The Little Drummer", and "The Lakes of Pontchartrain," while Andy Irvine's thinner tenor works just as well on "Johnnie Cope". The other two Irvine contributions merit more detailed mention: "Baneasa's Green Glade" is an account of his time in Eastern Europe and is appropriately paired with the Bulgarian dance tune, "Mominsko Horo", the beginning of which will cause sundry and all to gape,"Is that really just one mandolin?"; and the cathartic climax of the album, "The Green Fields of Canada", which features a moving uillean pipes solo by Liam Og O'Floinn. Of the instrumentals which round out the mix, the set of joyous polkas really stands out and will set even the timid a-toe-tapping. In all, an essential recording for any self-respecting fan of Irish music!"
The Influences are Unimpeachable
Kevin L. Nenstiel | Kearney, Nebraska | 02/18/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This group's music has influences that can be heard throughout the Celtic spectrum. Celt-rock group Wolfstone, though barely from the same field, drew very heavily on this sound, as did Altan, though their sound is remarkably different for a fellow Irish band. This is where to go to find out what your favorite Celtic bands drew their greatest influences from."
Top-flight Irish music
Michael Williams | Geneva, Switzerland | 09/25/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I have some two dozen Irish CDs, and this is one of my favorites. The distinctive sound is somewhat less classical than the Chieftains and less folky than the Dubliners, with great melodies and voices. My children like to sing Johnny Cope and P is for Paddy on long car rides."