Search - Philip Jeck :: Surf

Surf
Philip Jeck
Surf
Genre: Dance & Electronic
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

Repress of this 1999 release. Philip Jeck is best known for his highly subversive work 'Vinyl Requiem' with Lol Sargent (a performance for 180 dansette record players, 12 slide-projectors and 2 movie-projectors). He has al...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Philip Jeck
Title: Surf
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Touch Records/Forced Exposure
Release Date: 12/8/2003
Genre: Dance & Electronic
Styles: Ambient, Electronica, Techno
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
Repress of this 1999 release. Philip Jeck is best known for his highly subversive work 'Vinyl Requiem' with Lol Sargent (a performance for 180 dansette record players, 12 slide-projectors and 2 movie-projectors). He has also worked extensively with the choreographer Laurie Booth, is a member of Slant and has had tracks released by Blast First (on the Deconstruct compilation) and The Soundworks Exchange (First Edition). Surf further explores his experimentation with loops and scratching. His methods leave much to chance; nothing is pre-planned or calculated. The seven tracks on this CD are surprisingly accessible: rhythms unfold from the miasma. Whilst highly original, there is a surprisingly antique feel to the sound: many of the samples, loops and scratches are taken from old vinyl records. Against nostalgia, Surf proves there to be vast potential in analogue recording processes, and by utilising seemingly outmoded sources, Philip Jeck shows that you don't need a 24 track digital console and an enormous hard disk to make music that is both innovative and involving. Touch.
 

CD Reviews

Rube Goldberg Glitch
Phil Avetxori | 05/15/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Philip Jeck is a different kind of turntablist. Rather than using rapid cutting and scratching to demonstrate his manual dexterity, Jeck uses multiple (over 100 at one award-winning performance) antiquated record players, carefully layering old, scratchy records that he modifies to play looping patterns. Much is left to chance: these dusty, popping loops combine in an ever-shifting landscape of aleatory rhythms and lurching drones. Just as important as the sounds of the recordings themselves are the skittering microrhythms created by scratches and years of accumulated grit. The listener's attention shifts from the foreground of this "analogue glitch", to the background of faded memories embodied in these worn grooves. Indeed, this music often has a nostalgic feel; like listening to a stack of obscure 45's found in a basement. But this cd is far from a mere pastiche of the history of recorded music. Jeck is no Postmodernist: the associations that his source material occasionally calls up are secondary to these loops as SOUND MATERIAL. The flashes of possible recognition are the dreamlife of these sounds as material reality. What we ultimately have here is an album of exemplary ambient/drone/glitch that out-does most computer generated post-Oval stutter (i.e. Stephan Mathieu, Nobakuza Takemura, Jim O'Rourke's recent Mego release), in terms of both creativity and emotional impact. Highly recommended, but for the real creme de Jeck, hunt down his "Vinyl Coda" cds."