Search - Phil Woods :: Heaven

Heaven
Phil Woods
Heaven
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

CD reissue of this album from the Jazz great, originally released in 1984. Heaven was the first to feature trumpeter Tom Harrell with the Phil Woods Quintet. The repertoire on the set is strong, with a pair of less-played ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Phil Woods
Title: Heaven
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Evidence
Release Date: 3/19/1996
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 730182214826

Synopsis

Album Description
CD reissue of this album from the Jazz great, originally released in 1984. Heaven was the first to feature trumpeter Tom Harrell with the Phil Woods Quintet. The repertoire on the set is strong, with a pair of less-played Duke Ellington pieces (the beautiful 'Heaven' and 'Azure') being performed along with Dave Brubeck's 'The Duke,' Sam Rivers' '222', the standard 'I'm Getting Sentimental Over You' and Harrell's 'Occurrence.' Phil Woods sounds inspired throughout the date by Harrell's presence, giving him another horn to work off of. 2008.

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CD Reviews

Hot and mellow - some of each
James A. Vedda | Alexandria, VA USA | 08/20/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is the unmistakable sound of seasoned players who have been working together for some time. By the time this session was recorded in 1984, drummer Bill Goodwin and bassist Steve Gilmore had been with Woods for a decade, and pianist Hal Galper had been with the group for five years. The newcomer was trumpeter Tom Harrell, but he fits in smoothly even though the group did not work with a trumpeter prior to his arrival.
The album starts with a refreshingly upbeat version of "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You." The next three tracks switch to a more mellow, easy listening mode with two Duke Ellington tunes ("Heaven" and "Azure") and a very nice rendition of the Dave Brubeck standard "The Duke" (which was Brubeck's tribute to Ellington). The alto-and-trumpet combination are very smooth, and a clarinet-and-muted-trumpet combination are used to provide a different tone color in the Ellington tunes. The mood changes again - back to straight ahead, energetic jazz - for the last two tracks, "222" and "Occurrence," the latter written by Harrell.
Woods is in good form throughout, and Harrell is a worthy partner. Some listeners may feel the album has a split personality (3 slow tunes with Woods on clarinet much of the time, 3 upbeat tunes with more aggressive alto and trumpet). Others may feel that the two Ellington tunes are missing the richness that only the Duke's full ensemble could provide. Still, there's plenty of enjoyable listening in this collection."