Search - Claude Debussy, Michael Tilson Thomas, Herbert von Karajan :: Panorama: Claude Debussy

Panorama: Claude Debussy
Claude Debussy, Michael Tilson Thomas, Herbert von Karajan
Panorama: Claude Debussy
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (18) - Disc #2

Terrific value, both in playing time (CD 2 alone plays for more than 81 minutes) and artistic merit. Karajan's 1964 La Mer has long been recognized as one of the classics of the gramophone, and Abbado's acutely atmospheric...  more »

      
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Amazon.com
Terrific value, both in playing time (CD 2 alone plays for more than 81 minutes) and artistic merit. Karajan's 1964 La Mer has long been recognized as one of the classics of the gramophone, and Abbado's acutely atmospheric account of the Nocturnes with the Boston Symphony Orchestra is scarcely less distinguished. We stay in that city for both the gorgeous Prelude à l'après-midi d'un faune (a voluptuously ecstatic performance from 1971 under the gifted young baton of Michael Tilson Thomas) and a ravishing Syrinx from the BSO's eloquent principal flute, Doriot Anthony Dwyer. And the pleasures don't end there: there's a live Estampes from the peerless Sviatoslav Richter, while the Melos Quartet of Stuttgart's version of the String Quartet can hold its own against any rival--as does a sublime, indeed inspirational rendering of the Cello Sonata from Mstislav Rostropovich with composer Benjamin Britten at the piano. By the way, it's a sobering thought to remember that the legendary Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli's crystalline, immaculately turned interpretation of the First Book of Preludes originally occupied one full-price CD on its own. In other words, if DG's selection appeals (and it certainly should), don't hesitate for a moment. --Andrew Achenbach
 

CD Reviews

The best, if not the most, Debussy that money can buy.
A. Braid | New York, NY | 03/29/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Clocking in at more than two-and-a-half hours of music by Debussy, this is one of the best collections of his music that money can buy. It includes definitive performances of his most popular symphonic, chamber, and solo piano works. Michelangeli, for instance, is known for, above all, his interpretations of Debussy. Gramophone magazine says of these recordings "Michelangeli subjects each note to the last refinements of shading and places it with hairsbreadth precision." Throughout their mature careers, Rostropovich and Britten were frequent collaborators in the repertory for cello and piano, including this very work. (Britten dedicated his solo cello suites to Rostropovich.) The Melos' recording of Debussy's String Quartet is among the best available. Nearly forty years after it's initial release, von Karajan's 1965 recording of La Mer with the Berlin Phil has stood the test of time, repeatedly deleted and then added back to the DG catalogue. Though only in his mid-20s when he made this Debussy Afternoon of a Faun with the BSO, M.T.T. delivers a ravashing and colorful account. And so on. An excellent addition to the collection of either a classical music beginner or one with more refined aural tastes."
A fine collection
R. J. Claster | Van Nuys, CA United States | 07/26/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This collection offers a very representative mixture of Debussy's works from orchestral, solo piano and chamber genres. However, I would offer two caveats. First, as to the La Mer, the Karajan performance is distinguished by the sensuous sheen he imparts to the music, but for a tarter, more idiomatically French approach, I would suggest listening to the Munch-Boston or Casadesus recordings as well. Secondly, as to the Michelangeli performance of the Book One Preludes, although impeccably played, this is a noticably deliberate and cold sounding rendition. For more warmth, flow and color, look elsewhere. Nevertheless, this set is an excellent introduction to Debussy."