Search - Oscar Peterson, Herb Ellis, Ray Brown :: Oscar Peterson Trio Live at the Blue Note

Oscar Peterson Trio Live at the Blue Note
Oscar Peterson, Herb Ellis, Ray Brown
Oscar Peterson Trio Live at the Blue Note
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1

This 1990 recording reunites Oscar Peterson's nonpareil 1950s trio of Ray Brown and Herb Ellis, fleshing out the lineup with drummer Bobby Durham from the great pianist's '60s group. Though all the principals were in their...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Oscar Peterson, Herb Ellis, Ray Brown
Title: Oscar Peterson Trio Live at the Blue Note
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Telarc
Original Release Date: 8/22/1990
Re-Release Date: 9/25/1990
Album Type: Live
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Swing Jazz, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 089408330421

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
This 1990 recording reunites Oscar Peterson's nonpareil 1950s trio of Ray Brown and Herb Ellis, fleshing out the lineup with drummer Bobby Durham from the great pianist's '60s group. Though all the principals were in their sixties at the time of the recording, their performances are as tight and fleet as ever, with Ellis sounding especially inspired. The ballads "I Remember You," "A Child Is Born," and "Tenderly" demonstrate their mature, melodic empathy, while "Honeysuckle Rose" and "Sweet Georgia Brown" are the type of barn burners for which Peterson and company were famous. --Rick Mitchell

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CD Reviews

Let There Be Vertex Presentation
My Uncle Stu | Boston | 05/15/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

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It's true. In a scientific study with a sample size of one, I can conclusively say that Oscar Peterson's music, with headphones speakers applied externally, an inch apart, towards the isthmus region, will successfully convert a breach baby to a vertex presentation. This is important because- for medicolegal reasons, breach babies are now delivered almost exclusively by C-section, resulting in a generation of midwives and OBs, in this country at least, who lack training in safely delivering a breach baby.

Oh sure, I thought I'd make him a genius. Started out with Bach and Mozart. But that didn't do it. Didn't do much. It was Robert Randolph and the Family Band "Live at the Wetlands" that really got him kicking. But it was live Oscar Peterson, that got him dancing, got him to take the dive transverse, and the track "Sushi" got him spelunking toward the sounds.

Even if you are not gravid, you will find this to be a great CD. I love Oscar but if you don't want to take my word on it, I'll quote Ray Charles, as seen in the piano installment of Martin Scorsese's Blues documentary: "Oscar Peterson is a m----- f------ piano player!"


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Veteran musicians at the peak of their maturity....
Robert J. Ament | Ballwin, MO United States | 06/10/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"playing in a setting of a relaxed "get-together" of old friends!Be it the blues or the exquisitely beautiful ballad medley, we're hearing the best of both worlds!!.....when the Oscar Peterson Trio had a guitarist and later when it had a drummer.The empathy and interplay by the musicians heard on this recording can only result from the years of experience of having played together.This is one of the best of Oscar's later albums! I don't think there's any doubt of that since it won two grammys in 1990, for Jazz Instrumental Soloist and for Jazz Instrumental Small Group.This is a welcome addition to anyone's jazz collection!"
Last Chance
Samuel Chell | Kenosha,, WI United States | 08/19/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is perhaps as good an outing as any by an Oscar-led combo post-1970. A comparison of this recording with live sessions made 6-7 years later will confirm that the earlier date was one of the last times Oscar's chops were as responsive as his spirit was willing. No small amount of the session's success is due to the rock-solid percussion work of Bobby Durham, one of the few drummers capable of keeping up with Oscar and Ray. One of the highlights is the unaccompanied, pyrotechnical exchange between Peterson and Ellis on "Sweet Georgia" (Oscar wins, but Herb counterpunches with surprising virtuosity)."