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Orbital 2
Orbital
Orbital 2
Genres: Dance & Electronic, World Music
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

After their groundbreaking debut, brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll quickly put trendy tags like "rave," "techno," and "hardcore" behind them. With Orbital 2, the brothers went to great lengths to show that some of their pri...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Orbital
Title: Orbital 2
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Uni/Full Frequency Range Recor
Release Date: 8/3/1993
Genres: Dance & Electronic, World Music
Styles: Ambient, Electronica, Techno, Europe, British Isles
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 016235102624

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
After their groundbreaking debut, brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll quickly put trendy tags like "rave," "techno," and "hardcore" behind them. With Orbital 2, the brothers went to great lengths to show that some of their primary interests lie beyond the dance floor, as influences like Miles Davis and Steve Reich crept into the fragmented, floating arrangements. Atmospheric tracks such as "Lush 3-1" and its near relative "Lush 3-2" transcended established electronic formulas by breaking away from regular beat patterns, and they borrowed Opus III vocalist Kirsty to create the catchy, entrancing mesmerizer "Halcyon + On + On." Orbital had come a long way from their breakthrough single "Chime," and by all indications would never go back again. --Aidin Vaziri

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CD Reviews

Needlessly repetitive at times, but gloriously melodic
Torley | torley.com | 09/04/2008
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I have many seminal memories attached to one track in particular: "Lush 3-1". While I don't know why it was numbered like a Super Mario Bros. level, the basic 4-4 kick supporting a crisp overlaid arrangement worked like magic. I originally heard this song while watching the music video on MTV, which was surprisingly boring yet worked -- maybe it was because I was zonked and tired, but it showed an array of people roaming a fairground, in search of bargains. (I know, it sounds like such a clash, but it fit so well for the mood I was in.)

Orbital's always had a gift for melodies, but this is a more daunting album if you're new to them and more comfortable with their tighter radio edits that have more of a conventional song structure (like their collab with David Gray): it takes many minutes for things to unfold, new elements being layered in 8- and 16-bar sections. After awhile, if you really pay attention, it feels formulaic, but if you dance to it without overanalyzing, there's this sublime beauty of all the pieces working together.

If you're new to Orbital, I'd recommend a compilation of their work -- namely the one titled Work 1989-2002, and then travel back in time to discover how they've evolved.

One of my fave, historical electronic music groups! Long live the Hartnoll Brothers!"