Search - Najma :: Forbidden Kiss

Forbidden Kiss
Najma
Forbidden Kiss
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1


      
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CD Details

All Artists: Najma
Title: Forbidden Kiss
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Shanachie
Release Date: 6/18/1996
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop
Styles: Far East & Asia, Middle East, Arabic, India & Pakistan, India
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 016351646323, 669910080450

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CD Reviews

Bouncy Indian movie pop/rock hits that westerners will love.
deano@ultranet.com | Boston, Massachusetts | 06/13/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"International pop album of the year! Beautifully-sung Indian (Hindi) movie hits, by the London-born Najma Akhtar (Led Zep friend), backed up by western musicians playing Asian and western instruments. Production values are top-notch. Najma has a luminous, shimmering voice. Songs are bouncy, tunes are catchy -- don't worry that you don't understand Hindi -- the music will take you away! Not your usual classical sitar stuff, this has a beat. Some of the original films were knockoffs of American spy movies, and you will hear some echoes of this in the music. The only downside is a couple of tracks where the band members attempt to sing backup vocals in Hindi. Sweetest love song: the catchy "Aaj Madosh...". If you like this one, try Najma's "Pukar" (Calling you)."
AN AFFECTIONATE AND FUN TRIBUTE TO A MASTER
Larry L. Looney | Austin, Texas USA | 06/12/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Nobody in the world produces more films annually than the Indian film industry -- and nowhere else in the world will the viewer/listener find the media of film and music more inseparable. Music has permeated Indian spirituality for thousands of years -- it should come as no surprise that their films (both sacred and secular in theme) are full of it as well.The music on this disc is (with the exception of one track) from the pen of an acknowledged master of Hindi film music, S. D. Burman. Love of this music has brought together talents from the east and west to present these songs in a refreshing new light, at the same time treating them with deep respect, true to the spirit in which they first appeared.The vocals are by Najma Akhtar -- pure, perfectly delivered, as in all of her cd outings; the arrangements and instruments are by westerners: Chris Rael and Jonathan Feinberg of the band Church of Betty provide the body of instrumentation (with several able guests), with the orchestral arrangements and keyboard duties being handled by Brian Woodbury. Rael also contributes the occasional prerequisite male vocal, in character, responding to Najma from time to time.There is humor in some of the arrangements, but never disrespectful. These musicians obviously love and honor this music, and it shows in the treatments. These are not mixes for dance clubs, but more like the real thing (at least what I have heard in Hindi films). This cd can serve as a great introduction to the wonderful world of Hindi film music, and can also be enjoyed by afficianados interested in a 'view from the outside' of this art form.One of my favorite discs, it never fails to bring a smile to my face. Highly recommended.[Thanks to Shanachie for making this recording available in the US -- my only complaint is their continually annoying habit of leaving recording dates off of their releases...]"
Actually 4.5 stars but had to dock for Vocal on Trk. 10
Larry L. Looney | 12/31/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"As the other reviewers indicate, this CD is a lot of fun and very well done. I especially appreciate the sharp, modern sound, which was not the case in many of the Bollywood recordings of the 1960s, when some of these songs were recorded for films. All in all, it is a very respectful tribute to the great S.D. Burman. However, I have to dock it 1/2 star because arranger Chris Rael felt compelled to sing an English translation of the last song by himself. Rael's vocal chops are not that impressive and the song comes off as a lame 1960s peace-and-love ditty. It reminds me of the annoying take on an Afro-Peruvian song that David Byrne does on his compilation of that genre of music. Guys! Thanks for bringing this music to our attention, but please stay in the background. Oh well, I'll just program trk 10 out. Najima is great, by the way. She won't make me forget Asha Bhosle and Lata Mangeshkar but she holds her own very well."