Search - Taj Mahal, Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, Narasimhan Ravikiran :: Mumtaz Mahal

Mumtaz Mahal
Taj Mahal, Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, Narasimhan Ravikiran
Mumtaz Mahal
Genres: Country, Blues, World Music, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

In 1992, producer Kavichandran Alexander recorded California bottleneck guitarist Ry Cooder and North Indian classical musician Bhatt in a Santa Barbara church, and the resulting A Meeting by the River won a 1994 Grammy. H...  more »

      
?

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Taj Mahal, Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, Narasimhan Ravikiran
Title: Mumtaz Mahal
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Water Lily Acoustics
Release Date: 5/16/1995
Genres: Country, Blues, World Music, Pop
Styles: Contemporary Blues, Electric Blues, Africa, India & Pakistan, India
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
Other Editions: Mumtaz Mahal
UPC: 707723004628

Synopsis

Amazon.com
In 1992, producer Kavichandran Alexander recorded California bottleneck guitarist Ry Cooder and North Indian classical musician Bhatt in a Santa Barbara church, and the resulting A Meeting by the River won a 1994 Grammy. Here, Alexander returns to the church with Bhatt and Cooder's old bandmate, Taj Mahal, a blues musician who named himself after the most famous mausoleum in India. Bhatt, a Ravi Shankar student, plays the mohan vina, an instrument he invented to combine the timbre of the arched-top American jazz guitar with the sympathetic strings of the Indian sitar. Ravikiran plays the chitra vina, perhaps the world's oldest slide instrument; Mahal plays National steel guitar and adds moaning scat vocals. With their sliding pitches, all three instruments find the notes between the notes of traditional Western scales, and the three players find a common ground in the religious/sexual cries that skid through scales. --Geoffrey Himes

Similar CDs


Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

Another great Mahaler
thisnicknameisnottaken | 05/20/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Anyone who was intrigued by _Kulanjan_ will find this album of interest too; it's another exploration by Taj Mahal of how his music intersects and interlocks with that of another culture, in this case, Indian. Throughout the album, the music is understated but definitely stands up well under repeat listens - especially the 11-minute-plus version of Robert Johnson's "Come on in my kitchen"."
Too many fillers too much fumbling
Dave P. | 07/10/2001
(1 out of 5 stars)

"This CD was a great disappointment to me as I like all of the artists.Tracks 1 and 3 are purely instrumental and meander along in a very unstriking fashion. In the songs Bhatt and Ravikiran don't seem too sure what thay are meant to be doing, so only very occasionally is there any fluidity in their playing."
Doodle
Mr. Pete | Hydra, Greece | 06/28/2003
(1 out of 5 stars)

"After repeated listenings, why I don't know, this album has just gotten worse. If one compares it to MEETING BY THE RIVER, it really palls. "Johnny Too Bad" is the only cut I can imaging listening to again - hence the 1 star. Sorry, Taj."