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Mozart: Piano Concerti 9 & 27
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Andras Ligeti, Concentus Hungaricus
Mozart: Piano Concerti 9 & 27
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

Jenö Jandó's budget-priced Mozart piano concerto cycle is both excellent value for the money and artistically worthy on its own account. The Ninth Concerto is the first of Mozart's "great" piano concertos, and it begins ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Andras Ligeti, Concentus Hungaricus, Jenö Jandó
Title: Mozart: Piano Concerti 9 & 27
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Naxos
Original Release Date: 1/1/1990
Re-Release Date: 2/15/1994
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Concertos, Historical Periods, Classical (c.1770-1830), Instruments, Keyboard
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 730099520324

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Jenö Jandó's budget-priced Mozart piano concerto cycle is both excellent value for the money and artistically worthy on its own account. The Ninth Concerto is the first of Mozart's "great" piano concertos, and it begins in a way he was never to repeat: the piano answers the orchestra's opening phrase immediately, before the orchestra presents the first movement's thematic material alone, as was Mozart's later practice. This was an opening that Beethoven and Brahms both remembered when they came to write their Fifth and Second Piano Concertos, respectively. The 27th Concerto is the last, and, though Mozart couldn't have known it, the music exudes a uniquely Romantic melancholy. A clever and enjoyable pairing. --David Hurwitz
 

CD Reviews

A bargain worth purchasing.
04/04/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is a well recorded cd with rock bottom price. Naxos makes budget cd's that are absolutely worth purchasing to either the normal listeners or the hardcore collectors. I especially recommend the Haydn string quartes, the Mozart Piano Concertos, and the Haydn Piano concerto and sonatos. They are of exceptional values."
Mozart's first piano masterpiece.
Stephen Caratzas | Brooklyn, New York | 06/13/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Mozart's piano concerto no. 9 in E flat major ("Jeunehomme") has long been my favorite. The first movement in particular seems to embody all the qualities that make Mozart's music so wonderful: a main melody line that is in turns winsome and soaring, a conversation between the soloist and the orchestra, and a sense of majesty that no one but Mozart could conjure up.This Naxos budget disc measures up to the piece with a clear, precise sound that belies the budget price. Jeno Jando's piano playing is a revelation: delicate when it needs to be, firm when the music demands it. That he is not a more renowned performer seems unfortunate."
Meticulously prepared soloist with esprit
Leslie Richford | Selsingen, Lower Saxony | 12/29/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Recorded at the famous Italian Institute in Budapest in June 1989, this third volume of Jenö Jandó?s Mozart Complete Piano Concerto edition confirms the impression created by the first two volumes, namely that this series is one of Naxos?s highlights and that the individual CDs are extremely good value for money, combining a meticulously prepared soloist rich in the necessary ?esprit? with an orchestra that is certainly not content to just ?play along? but wants to leave its own impression, a conductor who has just the right feel for tempi and volume in this music and a recording technique that, although not perfect, fulfils its purpose more than adequately. The only tiny grumble I had while listening was the reverberation of an over-presently recorded double bass during Concerto No. 9. Perhaps it should be added that Vol. 3 has a highly interesting programme: Concerto No. 9 is perhaps the first of Mozart?s Piano Concertos to break through traditional barriers: for example, he has the soloist entering almost immediately with the theme before allowing the orchestra its usual introduction. And Concerto No. 27, the last of Mozart?s Piano Concertos, shows us a composer who is so much at home in the genre that he can do without some of the extra flourishes of the previous concertos in the series and just provide us with entertaining, virtuoso piano music that can hold one spell-bound by its sparkling sound even without any ?gimmicks?. Full marks to Mozart, full marks to Jenö Jandó and very nearly full marks to Naxos, too."