Search - Mitch Ryder :: Take a Ride

Take a Ride
Mitch Ryder
Take a Ride
Genres: Pop, R&B, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Motor City legends Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels set unsurpassed standards for balls-out American white-boy R&B. Under the aegis of crack producer Bob Crewe, the Wheels shot to fame, propelled by Ryder's sweat-soaked ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Mitch Ryder
Title: Take a Ride
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sundazed Music Inc.
Release Date: 10/19/1993
Genres: Pop, R&B, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Styles: Oldies, Vocal Pop, Soul, Oldies & Retro, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 090771600721

Synopsis

Album Description
Motor City legends Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels set unsurpassed standards for balls-out American white-boy R&B. Under the aegis of crack producer Bob Crewe, the Wheels shot to fame, propelled by Ryder's sweat-soaked soulful vocals, the piercing, mile-a-minute guitar sting of Jim McCarty, and the piledriver drum attack of Johnny Bee. Attacking rock and R&B with a startling, head-on frenzy, the group created a rock-n-soul dynasty still without equal. Sundazed presents 1966's Take a Ride in galvanizing mono, with the classic original album artwork faithfully reproduced!
 

CD Reviews

See Mitch Ryder
Johnny Heering | Bethel, CT United States | 02/27/2004
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This was Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels first album. It was released in the wake of their smash hit single "Jenny Take a Ride". The rest of the album mostly consists of cover versions of recent R&B hits. The two exceptions are "I Hope" and "Baby Jane", which were previously released as b-sides. "I Hope" is a pretty lame ballad, but "Baby Jane" is actually a very enjoyable Dylanesque(believe it or not) song. As for the R&B covers, they aren't bad, but they really can't match up with the original versions. One big mistake they made here was playing three James Brown songs in a row. Mitch is a great singer, but attempting to cover James Brown is pure foolishness (just ask the Who). The one bonus track here is Mitch's "almost" hit "Joy". It was recorded about 18 months after the rest of the album, after Mitch left the Detroit Wheels, and feels out of place here. All in all, this is not a bad album, but I think most people would prefer to get a Mitch Ryder "hits" album."