Search - Mike Morrow & Simon Preston :: Now Make We Merthe

Now Make We Merthe
Mike Morrow & Simon Preston
Now Make We Merthe
Genres: Special Interest, Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (26) - Disc #1

This excellent recording is both fun and informative in its skillfully performed program of more than two dozen songs, carols, and rounds from medieval and Renaissance England. The selections are drawn from three albums ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Mike Morrow & Simon Preston
Title: Now Make We Merthe
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Boston Skyline
Release Date: 4/7/1994
Genres: Special Interest, Pop, Classical
Styles: Holiday & Wedding, Vocal Pop, Opera & Classical Vocal, Chamber Music, Historical Periods, Baroque (c.1600-1750), Early Music
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 730357012127

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This excellent recording is both fun and informative in its skillfully performed program of more than two dozen songs, carols, and rounds from medieval and Renaissance England. The selections are drawn from three albums recorded during the 1960s for the Argo label. The performances--of both familiar and little-known tunes--are sung and played by some of England's most acclaimed musicians, including tenor Robert Tear, harpist Osian Ellis, the London Brass Ensemble, and period instrumentalist David Munrow. Among the highlights are "Foweles in the frith," a fascinating 13th-century six-part canon; "Nowell: Dieus vous garde," a highly syncopated antiphonal 15th- century choral piece; and the gentle lullaby "Lullay, lullow: I saw a sweete seemly sight," sung by two boy trebles. The albums' original, first- rate liner notes are included. --David Vernier

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CD Reviews

Quite charming
J. C Clark | Overland Park, KS United States | 06/02/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This material ranges from the superlative to the dull. But the vast majority is delightful, winningly sung and played, with the big names of that era featured: Simon Preston, Ian Partridge, Robert Tear, and the incomparable David Munrow.This CD is the contents of two mid 60s LPs with a few tidbits from another tossed in. Maybe it's just familiarity, but the seelctions I prefer are those from the LP I had. Great to hear again, in a clear, light transfer. The recording is quite good; try Deo gracias Anglia with the headphones...just stellar.Stuff you won't readily hear elsewhere; performance ideas have changed for this music, mostly downhill, I would argue. This is joyous, jolly, full of verve and merthe."