Search - Mike Ireland & Holler :: Learning How to Live

Learning How to Live
Mike Ireland & Holler
Learning How to Live
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Find some alt-country falling too far on the rock side to satisfy your yearning for twang? You won't have that problem with Mike Ireland & Holler's debut album, which brings to mind Dwight Yoakam's Bakersfield revisionism,...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Mike Ireland & Holler
Title: Learning How to Live
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: Sire / London/Rhino
Release Date: 3/10/1998
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Americana, Classic Country, Traditional Folk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 643443102124

Synopsis

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Find some alt-country falling too far on the rock side to satisfy your yearning for twang? You won't have that problem with Mike Ireland & Holler's debut album, which brings to mind Dwight Yoakam's Bakersfield revisionism, with occasional forays into terse string arrangements inspired by George Jones's '70s hits and even Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billie Joe." Ireland recognizes the eloquence of those records, and borrows some of it for himself. While most of this music is understated in its pain, Ireland occasionally gets as wild-eyed as the great Texas honky-tonker Gary Stewart, who'd be proud to put his name to the bitter "Don't Call This Love." Not that sentimentality doesn't get its due: hear "Christmas Past" and the cover of Johnnie Ray's 1951 hit "Cry." --Rickey Wright

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CD Reviews

Great Modern Countrypolitan
C. Bradley | Washington, DC United States | 08/08/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is a great album. Mike is a great interpreter of classic country music. His voice is strong and smooth, and his lyrics are crafted with poetic imagination. I agree that Mike deserves to be grouped with Yoakum and the Mavericks, as other reviewers have, in that he hews to what's best in the country tradition while maintaining his individuality. He differs stylistically, however, from Yoakum and the Mavericks. Mike follows the "countrypolitan" tradition of Charlie Rich and Billy Sherill. He does use strings more sparingly than traditional countrypolitan does, so the music never sounds overproduced."