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Marsupilami
Marsupilami
Marsupilami
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

2008 digitally remastered reissue of Marsupilami's self titled debut album, originally released in 1970. Initially a Folk-based group, the band evolved into one of the most adventurous, if unsung, Progressive bands of the ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Marsupilami
Title: Marsupilami
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Esoteric
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 1/13/2009
Album Type: Import
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
Style:
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
2008 digitally remastered reissue of Marsupilami's self titled debut album, originally released in 1970. Initially a Folk-based group, the band evolved into one of the most adventurous, if unsung, Progressive bands of the early '70s, producing two stunningly original albums. Featuring a line-up of brothers Fred and Leary Hasson (lead vocals and harmonica and keyboards respectively), Dave Laverock (guitar), Richard Lathan Hicks (bass), Jessica Stanley Clarke (flute, vocals) and Mike Fouracre (drums), Marsupilami drew early comparisons to such contemporaries as Quintessence and Gryphon, although in truth the group were far more experimental and powerful. Esoteric.

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CD Reviews

Great obscure progressive
prog | Israel | 09/02/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Marsupilami is one of the obscure progressive bands that made excellent music in the early seventies.
They managed to record 2 cd - this one and ARENA which is excellent as well.
They combine keyboard work, guitars, flute and unique song writing.
This CD has 5 tracks, and every one is a winner.
I think that the first track is the greatest.
Listen to it."
It's different and sometimes that's a good thing
B. E Jackson | Pennsylvania | 04/15/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I'm at a complete loss how to describe Marsupilami.

One minute their music features pretty flute playing, the next some intense and rather messy-sounding keyboard jams, and then they change in ANOTHER direction with some wild guitar jams that rumble through the speakers in a way that would make the Mahavishnu Orchestra proud. So to sum it up, I guess they can make their music pretty, heavy, and out of control whenever they feel like it.

That makes them a rather interesting art rock band that wasn't afraid to take chances, and you know, I've always admired bands that take chances because it's a gutsy move that can either make or break a band. Back in the 70's though, this kind of experimenting was considered cool and welcoming, and honestly, there's plenty of good ideas on the album, some of which are even pretty melodic.

I don't know what to think- perhaps King Crimson fans would appreciate this kind of music the most.

"