Search - Mark Lanegan :: Winding Sheet

Winding Sheet
Mark Lanegan
Winding Sheet
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

The singer for the Screaming Trees, Lanegan here choses to substitute his band's psychedelic yawp for the moody introspection of modern blues. His smooth croon transforms into an angry growl when the music turns stormy. "M...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Mark Lanegan
Title: Winding Sheet
Members Wishing: 7
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sub Pop
Release Date: 5/22/1992
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Indie & Lo-Fi, Singer-Songwriters, Singer-Songwriters
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 098787006124, 098787006117, 098787006148, 098787006162

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The singer for the Screaming Trees, Lanegan here choses to substitute his band's psychedelic yawp for the moody introspection of modern blues. His smooth croon transforms into an angry growl when the music turns stormy. "Mockingbirds" features a treacherously descending piano melody; "Wild Flowers" allows for an out-of-tune guitar to explain its world-weariness. "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?" is noted for being the first time a Seattle grunge-rocker tackled the old Leadbelly classic. (The second Seattle guy to tackle it, Kurt Cobain, can be heard on electric guitar and on backing vocals for "Down in the Dark.") --Rob O'Connor

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Member CD Reviews

Tim H. (TurnItUpTim)
Reviewed on 8/4/2010...
I am a HUGE Screaming Trees/Mark Lanegan fan, but to be honest, most of the songs on this album sound too similar. Standout tracks include "Undertow" and "Ugly Sunday".

For historical reference, it's nice to hear Kurt Cobain on background vocals for "Down in the Dark". In addition, both Kurt AND Krist Novoselic play guitar and bass (respectively) on "Where Did You Sleep Last Night" - a raw, distorted dirge, completely different from Nirvana's haunting Unplugged performance. The album is quite dark in mood, so the silly track "Juarez" lightens the mood as the album draws to a close.

As a side note, Pacific Northwest indie music scene producer Steve Fisk plays the organ/piano on a few tracks.
2 of 2 member(s) found this review helpful.

CD Reviews

The spiritual heart of "Seattle" music
Dan Miller | Reno, NV USA | 10/02/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If you strip away the distorted guitar and breathless screaming from the best of what was known as grunge or the Seattle sound you are left with a mood, a sort of aching but wise melancholy. This album is the perfect embodiment of that deep but shining sadness. Where does it come from? Something about the climate? The quality of light on a Seattle winter day when the sun bursts through just before sundown and turns the cold grey city golden for a few short minutes before the long northern night? I don't know, but whatever it is, Lanegan has an almost angelic gift for rendering it into sound. The songs on this album (and his others) are "mood" music that will surely stand the test of time. I only know that in all the years I have owned this album I have never once tired of listening to it."
The Reluctant Loner Hears His First Welcome Knocks.
Dan Miller | 06/17/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Songwriters often spend their time kicking up dust at the crossroads only to catch the attention of the devil. The bad luck of obscurity. Heaven has hired angels to sing of its victories, but the hushed divinity of sadness speaks only in whispers and murmurs. Mark Lanegan's solo efforts, "The Winding Sheet" and "Whiskey for the Holy Ghost" deserve the solemn bows of the masses. They embody a nature of sunshine solemnity that gives the contemplation of human imperfection the glowing positivity of a benediction. Am I overreacting? Yes. I am tired of impersonal pleas and generic recommendations. This is art. Once upon a time these things meant life. You can breathe this music and nothing else. Listen and overreact with me. Knock, knock."