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Marcello: Estro poetico-armonico/Junghanel, Cantus Colln
Marcello, Cantus Colln, Konrad Junghanel
Marcello: Estro poetico-armonico/Junghanel, Cantus Colln
Genres: Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

It's a funny thing, the way reputations rise and fall and fade. Nowadays, Antonio Vivaldi is about as well-known as a Baroque composer can be, while his contemporary Benedetto Marcello is familiar to only a few (so far). ...  more »

      
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All Artists: Marcello, Cantus Colln, Konrad Junghanel
Title: Marcello: Estro poetico-armonico/Junghanel, Cantus Colln
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Harmonia Mundi Fr.
Release Date: 7/11/2000
Album Type: Import
Genres: Pop, Classical
Styles: Vocal Pop, Opera & Classical Vocal, Chamber Music, Historical Periods, Baroque (c.1600-1750), Classical (c.1770-1830)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 794881506620

Synopsis

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It's a funny thing, the way reputations rise and fall and fade. Nowadays, Antonio Vivaldi is about as well-known as a Baroque composer can be, while his contemporary Benedetto Marcello is familiar to only a few (so far). Yet in early 18th-century Venice, both composers were equally respected--in fact, Marcello's music was performed regularly as late as 1790, while Vivaldi's music was considered passé 50 years earlier. Benedetto Marcello, as the scion of a prominent and wealthy Venetian family, didn't have to please the music-buying public (as Vivaldi did) to make a living--and he took advantage of the freedom to follow his own muse. Where Vivaldi stuck closely to established, recognizable forms (such as the ABA da capo aria and the slow-fast-slow-fast church sonata), Marcello subordinated his musical setting to the text in much the way Monteverdi, Cavalli, and Schütz did a century earlier. In Estro poetico-armonico, a collection of Italian-language Psalm-settings for one to four solo voices, this means that the scoring, meter and/or key may change--sometimes quite abruptly--whenever there's a new idea in the text. The result sometimes seems disjointed or even downright weird, but the music is often quite lovely--and arguably very appropriate for the Psalms, whose sudden changes of mood and imagery have confounded more than one reader. Members of Cantus Cölln--here, just four singers and continuo--give a sensitive and skillful performance of five selections from the Estro. On first hearing, one might wish for more Italian-style extroversion, but the more you listen, the more subtlety, intelligence, and feeling you'll find. It's always that way with Cantus Cölln--the better you know them, the more admirable they seem. --Matthew Westphal

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