Search - Lynn Morris :: Mama's Hand

Mama's Hand
Lynn Morris
Mama's Hand
Genres: Country, Folk, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

The parallels between Lynn Morris and Alison Krauss are too obvious to ignore. Like Krauss, Morris first made her mark as an instrumental prodigy (in Morris' case, on banjo) yet eventually made her deepest impression as a ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Lynn Morris
Title: Mama's Hand
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rounder Select
Release Date: 9/19/1995
Genres: Country, Folk, Pop
Styles: Bluegrass, Traditional Folk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 011661032828

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The parallels between Lynn Morris and Alison Krauss are too obvious to ignore. Like Krauss, Morris first made her mark as an instrumental prodigy (in Morris' case, on banjo) yet eventually made her deepest impression as a singer and bandleader. Like Krauss, Morris has recast bluegrass--previously known for its speed-demon breaks--as a slower, more song-oriented music on a series of superb albums. Morris hasn't achieved Krauss's commercial breakthrough yet, but it's not inconceivable that she could. You don't need any comparisons to Krauss, however, to appreciate the distinction of the title track on Morris' third album, Mama's Hand. This Hazel Dickens song tells the universal story of a teenager somewhat reluctantly leaving a backwater town to seek her fortune elsewhere. Set against a very simple, nicely understated Carter Family-like backing, Morris's warbling soprano is way out front. Stripped clean of all the showy embellishments many singers mistake for drama, her plain, open vocal captures both the high hopes of starting a new life and the heartbreak of saying goodbye to her mother. She never whines but projects the strength a young woman needs to leave behind everyone and everything she knows. Morris's three bandmates--Tom Adams on banjo, David McLaughlin on mandolin and guitar, and Marshall Wilborn on upright bass--are all alumni of the Johnson Mountain Boys, the best traditional bluegrass band of the baby-boomer generation. Because the quartet is fiddler-less as well as drummer-less, Morris's voice is the only sustaining instrument in the mix and thus it stands out dramatically from the percussive arpeggios around her. --Geoffrey Himes

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CD Reviews

Traditional bluegrass at its finest
Peter Durward Harris | Leicester England | 09/07/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Lynn has never been the most prolific recording artist but her albums are always worth hearing - and so it is with this 1995 release. The songs, typically for Lynn and her band, are a mix of covers and originals.The set opens with Walking the blues, in which the very upbeat music suggests that Lynn is not as down as the title suggests. Another song in the same vein is It rains everywhere I go.Two of the originals here - Old Rip and Dancing in the hog trough - are banjo instrumentals played by Lynn. On all other tracks where a banjo is required, Tom Adams plays it.Other tracks here include Ain't necessarily so (sung by Lynn's husband Marshall Wilborn and written by Beth Neilson Chapman), Wishful thinking (a Wynn Stewart oldie) and the title track written by Hazel Dickens, another fine bluegrass singer. Marshall also sings Freight train blues and Tell me how to mend a broken heart, while Lynn and Marshall sing I can call Jesus as a duet. Lynn sings all the other songs here.

This is an excellent album with its roots firmly set in traditional bluegrass."
I'm biased
hatch | Idaho USA | 06/02/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I'm biased, because I like just about everything Lynn Morris and her band put out. This CD is no exception, and is one of my favorites. There are a lot of different approaches people can bring to bluegrass music, but her style suits my preferences. Her voice is perfect for the music she sings. For example, I don't think I can imagine anyone doing a better cover of Hazel Dickens' "Mama's Hand" then the one that's on this CD. If you like female vocal bluegrass, it's likely you'll be happy with this. Some of the tracks are sung by band member Marshall Wilborn, and these are equally enjoyable.
Favorite tracks (but they're all great):
1. Mama's Hand
2. It Rains Everywhere I Go
3. Walking The Blues
4. No One Has To Tell Me
5. I Can Call Jesus"