Search - Lyle Ritz :: Time

Time
Lyle Ritz
Time
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Lyle Ritz has been a studio musician for over 40 years. Usually hired to play bass, he's been heard behind the likes of Johnny Mathis, Burt Bacharach, and Frank Sinatra. On this CD he attempts to elevate the ukulele to the...  more »

      

CD Details

All Artists: Lyle Ritz
Title: Time
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Roy Sukama Productions
Release Date: 5/19/1998
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop
Styles: Pacific Islands, Hawaii, Swing Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 734015558323, 534015558329, 734015558347

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Lyle Ritz has been a studio musician for over 40 years. Usually hired to play bass, he's been heard behind the likes of Johnny Mathis, Burt Bacharach, and Frank Sinatra. On this CD he attempts to elevate the ukulele to the status of legitimate jazz instrument, accompanied by Byron Yasui on bass and Noel Okimoto on percussion. He covers material ranging from Duke Ellington to Billy Joel, with mixed success. While he's accomplished at noodling jazz that sounds similar to the more conventional guitar solos one might hear at a hotel cocktail lounge in Honolulu, there's not much point in transferring this tepid style to the ukulele except for the novelty. Then again, if you enjoy "lounge" music and are intrigued by it being performed on the ukulele, this album is for you. --Melissa Axelrod and Terry Zwigoff
 

CD Reviews

Lyle Ritz's 'Ukulele Jazz
12/29/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The liner notes in this CD mentions that Lyle played some 5,000 recording sessions with artists including the Beach Boys, Ray Charles, Tina Turner, Frank Sinatra and many others. He has performed in Oscar-winning movie scores by Burt Bacharach and John Williams, and has many television credits. But all of these performances showcased Lyle's artistry on the acoustic and electric bass. This album does not represent what most people think of as ukulele music. This is smooth jazz that casts a relaxing mood, and will leave you wondering why guitar players need those extra two strings. The same sense of rhythm and economy of notes that make great bass playing translates to wonderful ukulele jazz."