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Liszt & Enesco Rhapsodies No. 1
George Enescu, Franz Liszt, Antal Dorati
Liszt & Enesco Rhapsodies No. 1
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

The most famous Hungarian Rhapsody is No. 2--the one that had Bugs Bunny chasing a mouse up and down the keyboard of his piano. However, if you like No. 2, you'll like the rest of them. There are about 16 in all, but on...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: George Enescu, Franz Liszt, Antal Dorati, Harold Lawrence, London Symphony Orchestra
Title: Liszt & Enesco Rhapsodies No. 1
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Polygram Records
Release Date: 5/10/1991
Genre: Classical
Styles: Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century, Romantic (c.1820-1910)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 028943201520

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The most famous Hungarian Rhapsody is No. 2--the one that had Bugs Bunny chasing a mouse up and down the keyboard of his piano. However, if you like No. 2, you'll like the rest of them. There are about 16 in all, but only these six also exist in orchestral versions, and they sound very different from the piano originals. Antal Dorati is simply unbeatable in music like this: he keeps everything moving in an exciting fashion, gets a disciplined response from the orchestra, and knows the music like the back of his hand. Mercury's recording is close-up and colorful, much like the music itself. This is pure fun, no more, no less. --David Hurwitz
 

CD Reviews

Dance for days!!
TchaikJP | Houston, TX United States | 10/22/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"These rhapsodies bubble over with foot-tapping dance rhythms, contagiously jovial melodies, sensuous gypsy tunes, and an incredible endless array of striking ORCHESTRAL COLOR. Liszt's flair for such intense and specific coloration with his piquant harmonies and orchestration make these pieces irresitable in the hands of ANY conductor. However, in Dorati's hands, a ballet master, the dance truly lives in every bar. Muscular, controlled, yet allowing for the written-in zany-ness inherent in each rhapsody. Also, again his gutty strings coupled with Mercury's "front-row-seat" sound really make for thrilling experiences. (as in the opening bars of number 4 on the disc: WOW!) Those who buy this CD for the popular Rhapsody 2 (from Tom and Jerry and other various cartoons) will be delighted to know that you will soon fall in love with EVERY rhapsody on here. They all have their own unique character, but are comprised of those same essential elements of anything so purely likable and fun. The Enesco Rhapsody which begins the CD is another one which I am thankful to be introduced to- poignant, tender, and later racous and brutishly energetic.You will not be displeased with this. Beware the contagious nature though, you may find yourself singing and dancing to these on the inside all day!"
Dorati In His Prime
J Keistler | Lake Jackson, Texas USA | 12/02/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"When I want a CD to play for friends who are non-classical, I pick this one. What fun! Dorati is indeed in his element with this music, particularly the Enescu work. This is music accessible to people of all musical persuasions. Of course, the Living Presence technique of recording only enhances the beauty of Dorati's performance. Convincing argument for the analog crowd!"
Sonic and musical spectacular!
John Keane | Gilbertsville, NY | 08/20/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This must have been one of the most spectacular recordings of the early stereo period, when they were striving for effect. I don't know enough to say whether the orchestration is authentic, but the record is worth the price for the cembalom sounds alone. A friend listened to it with me and remembered getting the Second Rhapsody as a promotion as a child. It started him on a life-long love of classical music. I too remember the cover, but my entry-point was probably Offenbach and Suppe. Anybody out there remember a 78 of Suppe's Fatinitza, backed by Toselli's Rimpianto? The madeleine of music. John Keane"