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Liszt: Arabesques - Russian and Hungarian Transcriptions
Franz Liszt, Alexander Borodin, Leslie Howard
Liszt: Arabesques - Russian and Hungarian Transcriptions
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Special Interest, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (16) - Disc #1

It's important to realize when it comes to Baroque music, "opus 1" does not mean the first piece of music the composer ever wrote. Rather, it refers to the first music he saw fit to publish. Each published opus consisted...  more »

      
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It's important to realize when it comes to Baroque music, "opus 1" does not mean the first piece of music the composer ever wrote. Rather, it refers to the first music he saw fit to publish. Each published opus consisted of a selection of the best of a large body of manuscript works, many of which would likely have become popular and gained wide circulation prior to appearing in print. Locatelli's Opus 1 concertos are among his very best pieces. They balance instrumental virtuosity with characterful melodic writing better than the Opus 3 concertos, for instance, and they are extremely well played and recorded here. --David Hurwitz
 

CD Reviews

Fine performance by Raglan Baroque
Ross Kennett | Narooma, NSW Australia | 02/08/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Locatelli's opus 1, 12 Concerti Grossi, published in 1721, follow the great Corelli's 12 Concerti Grossi, developed in the late 17th century and published posthumously in 1714. The concerto grosso form was a group of soloists, usually two violins and cello, the concertino, with an accompaning string group, the ripieno. This form was soon challenged by the Vivaldi model of virtuoso soloist with string accompaniment, but the concerto grosso survived untill the late 1760s. Guiliani took it to England where Handel's opus 6, "Mr Handel's twelve grand concertos" was published in 1740.
These concerti by Locatelli are good examples of the Corellian concerto, they have their share of virtuosity and melodic passages. They are not as good as Corelli, only Handel's could claim that, but it is fine baroque, and it is very well played by Elizabeth Wallfisch and the Raglan Baroque.
Recommended to all baroque lovers."