Search - Kirk Roland :: Meeting of Times

Meeting of Times
Kirk Roland
Meeting of Times
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1

2004 remastered reissue of 1972 album. This is Kirk's tribute to Ellington with Al Hibbler, a former member of Ellington's band and one of the most underrated singers of the 1940s. Nine tracks packaged in a digipak. Atl...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Kirk Roland
Title: Meeting of Times
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rhino/Wea UK
Original Release Date: 1/1/2004
Re-Release Date: 2/2/2004
Album Type: Import
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Traditional Jazz & Ragtime, Vocal Jazz, Bebop, Oldies, Vocal Pop, Traditional Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 081227368920, 766485283542, 603497052561

Synopsis

Album Description
2004 remastered reissue of 1972 album. This is Kirk's tribute to Ellington with Al Hibbler, a former member of Ellington's band and one of the most underrated singers of the 1940s. Nine tracks packaged in a digipak. Atlantic.
 

CD Reviews

Don't you just love when worlds meet?
Nikica Gilic | Zagreb, Croatia | 11/17/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is yet another of those beautiful albums in which jazz greats reach across the stylistic and generational divides and work beautifully with each other!

Ellington's legacy is, of course, a great starting point to glue together any two musical generations, but this album goes beyond that; showcasing eccentric and sadly underappreciated vocalist Hibbler in more then reverent company of the even more excentric multi-instrumentalist Kirk, with the added bonus of an extremely versatile and competent rhythm section consisting of Hank Jones (p), Ron Carter (b) and Oliver Jackson (dm).

Yes, this is definitely not a full-time Rahsaan Roland Kirk album (I must warn Kirk fans!), it is a gentle meeting of the times in which both parties contribute the best and the most sensitive extrovert and subtle jazz they can share with each other.
Mind you, only first 5 songs feature Hibbler, but his unique phrasing is really impresive, particularly on "Don't get around much anymore" and, my favorite number, "Lover come back to me", whereas Kirk uses his incredible tallent with taste, not showing off his ability to play more than one instrument at the same time. When he does his staff, he actually sounds like two (or even more) musicians working together very well.

Leon Thomas'vocal at the last song ("Dream") are not unpleasant but are no match to Hibbler's, nor do they work well with the original concept of the album.

However, all in all, this is great and imaginative music so some conceptual glitches shouldn't diminish the listening pleasure."
What a treat!
Hank Schwab | Indianapolis, IN USA | 01/12/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Really, this shouldn't have been such a surprise. Rahsaan included versions of Ellington songs on a lot of his albums, so this recording with Al Hibbler fits right in. It is, however, one of Rahsaan's few recordings with a vocalist, so even if you have a big Kirk collection, this is a must-have. Another difference that stands out is the personnel. Rather than the usual confident side-men, we get Ron Carter, Hank Jones and Lonny Liston Smith. Of all the Rahsaan albums I have, this one is near the top of the list."
The Bair
The Bair | 01/04/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Excuse me, but this recording is one of the greatest ever made under the large umbrella of the jazz genre. Rahsaan Roland Kirk has done what all great creative personalities do: to pay homage to another master by running it through their own unique artistic filter. Listen to how thoroughly he understands Ellington, Harry Carney, and Barney Bigard in the absolutely volcanic "Carney and Bigard Place." Listen to his bubbling clarinet work on "Daybreak," with one foot in Bechet territory, the other in the land of Coltrane. This is as good a studio snapshot of the great RRK as you can find. It is must listening for all jazz fans, scholars, and those curious few who are unafraid to approach art outside of the usual corporate product. A recording for the ages!"